Cause Of Homelessness

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The general idea of the homeless usually conveys a man, woman, or child, wearing ripped and disheveled clothing, who is going through trash cans or begging for money, near alleys or under bridges. Many individuals have encountered a homeless person at some point in their lives. As reported by journalist Stephen Burger, about 600,000 people are living either on the streets or in shelters trying to stay alive, everyday. Recently, the rate of homelessness has increased. This issue has raised a main concern about the causes and solutions. While there are many causes, health issues, natural disasters that lead to limited government support, and the increase of new laws contribute most to how people become homeless and how the homeless community …show more content…
It’s not uncommon to hear stories about a successful individual, hit a sudden low point in life, that influences the individual to make poor choices that often lead to isolation, depression, and/or substance abuse. However the case may be, some individuals may overcome the phase in life, while others may not. “Approximately 1 in 25 adults in the U.S.—10 million, or 4.2%—experiences a serious mental illness in a given year that substantially interferes with or limits one or more major life activities.” (Hunter). Mental illnesses are generally linked with the characteristics of the homeless. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, one third of the homeless population in the U.S. suffers a mental illness. This shows that the mental health significantly impacts the homeless community. In relation to mental instability, substance abuse ties into the physical damage these individuals obtain. “About 80 percent of the homeless who enter the City Mission in Cleveland, show symptoms of substance abuse” (Burger). It is prevalent that drugs and alcohol is what many homeless people resort to. Unforeseen mental health issues, accompanied with substance abuse is one of the traditional triggers to becoming …show more content…
According to Burger, city officials permitted a mission that provided cots for the homeless in chapels because it decreased the number of people on the streets. However, today, city officials prohibit this practice. Although there was no exact explanation, this shows the government may be against shelter for the homeless. In addition, “Licensing has brought regulations such as a ‘client 's bill of rights’ in Tennessee, which originally included the right not to be presented with religious teaching. (That 's somewhat like organizing a football team and including the right not to be touched!)” (Burger). The author’s side note was a good analogy that depicts … To an acute extent, “The Denver Rescue Mission is located in an area where the destitute congregated. In recent years, however, the area has been redeveloped and now supports a burgeoning nightlife.” (Burger). In other words, the government opposes missions that support a good cause for the homeless community. Instead of focusing on the needs of disadvantaged individuals, the government is fixated on the comfort of others who are already stable. The government should recognize the new laws and restrictions are harmful and worse on the homeless

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