Effects Of Gender Inequality In The Middle East

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Findings and Conclusions Education inequality is due to multiple limitations that women have to surpass in order to obtain an education, that is if they obtain one. Illiteracy keeps women from achieving their full potential as workers. High unemployment rates make it hard for Middle Eastern women to land a job to fund for their education or the education of their children. Economic inequality in the Middle East discourages women from getting educated because they will still get paid less than men. Education inequality in the Middle East affects females, therefore the Middle Eastern region should give females the right to education because they have lower literacy rates than males, higher unemployment rates, and economic inequality. Illiteracy …show more content…
In the article“Gender Equality and Development in the Middle East and North Africa region” the World Bank Group states that “Laws designed to protect women restrict the hours they can work” and that “in many countries, women require the permission of their male guardian to work.”(2011). To clarify, even the opportunities of the women who achieve a degree are restricted by working laws that limit their work hours, or the permission of their male guardian (such as a father or husband). As demonstrated by the graph “Female and Male labor Force Participation across MENA” provide by World Bank, female participation in the labor force across MENA is much lower than male participation. The graph visually presents the huge gender gap in employment in the Middle East, which affects even the United Arab Emirates, even though it had a higher female literacy rate than males in the previous graph. In conclusion, social and legal limitations will not work effectively due to being out of the area as previously …show more content…
More women taking up jobs puts extra strain on wives and mothers, while also increasing the gender education gap. In “A Negative Impact of Female Labor Participation on Women 's Empowerment?” Shahidur Rashid Talukdar argues that “outside work usually implies a dual burden for wives and mothers” (par4). In other words, having to work and be a wife or a mother is most of the time very stressful and taxing on women, they have a hard time doing both effectively. For example, analyses conducted across 409 Indian districts showed that when girls had lower literacy than boys, more women were working in that same area (Talukdar). This implies that women having jobs is not helpful to closing the education gap because of this. In short, increasing in women labor force participation can increase the education gender

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