Effects Of Discrimination In South Africa

1174 Words 5 Pages
World War II and the atrocities that occurred due to the overbearingly anti-Semitic ideals of the German government and its social majority made the world hypersensitive to other acts of subjugation based on race in years following. The issue of racist legislation in South Africa was brought to, and discussed in, the United Nations in 1952, 6 years after India first voiced its concerns for the treatment of Indian people living in the nation. The South African government objected to any UN intervention by reasons of maintaining its sovereignty, and many western nations agreed; “[…] apartheid [is] part of the internal affairs of [South Africa], and for this reason [falls] beyond the scope of the United Nations” (South African History Online 2011). …show more content…
Many nations began to openly criticize the government, and the UN Security Council, after declaring Apartheid to be a threat to international peace and security, called upon the South African government to ameliorate the racial friction. After failing to do so, the General Assembly requested the member states to cut all diplomatic, trade, and transport ties with South Africa, a threat to convince them to repeal their policies of Apartheid. Following suit, the 1963 creation of the Organization of African Unity (OAU) strengthened the international opposition of Apartheid and “immediately called for sanctions against South Africa” (South African History Online 2011). Unfortunately, neither of these early sanctions was ever deemed mandatory so there was not much of a negative fiscal …show more content…
When the South African economy began to develop in the early 1970’s, there was an increase in demand for labor. Since the Pass Laws and the Bantu Building Workers Act created a system of employment restrictions that severely limited the black South Africans ability to work in certain fields, the surge in the urban labor markets was a major problem for apartheid. This was not only due to the fact that a vital part of apartheid legislation was to keep black South Africans out of the cities and in their homelands, it also highlighted the fact that the majority of the population was black South Africans. Realizing that if nothing was done to fill the labor shortages, in 1973, the government contradicted its previous legislation and allowed black South Africans to work, in skilled positions, in white-only areas; “this was a dramatic undermining of the rationale of apartheid and was only the first in a series of reforms in which the employment restrictions were relaxed” (Levy 1999). South Africa continued to suffer under the system of apartheid because of its dependence of external investment and foreign capital. After the Soweto Uprising in 1976, the focus of world stage turned to South African oppression. This resulted in the UN imposing new regulations for private foreign businesses operating in the country. Due to the political unrest, economic instability, and social pressure

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