Effects Of Climate Change In The Philippines

1480 Words 6 Pages
National Geographic’s article on Farming and Agriculture states that, “40 percent of the Earth 's land is now given over to agriculture” (Owen, 1). This means the amount of land susceptible to the detrimental effects of climate change is incredibly vast. The Farming and Agriculture article also notes that, “maps suggest that an area roughly the size of South America is used for crop production, while even more land; 7.9 to 8.9 billion acres (3.2 to 3.6 billion) is being used to raise livestock” (Owen, 1). EPA.gov states that the United States alone supply 25% of grain to the global market. The effects of climate change on agriculture again coincide with increase in CO2 levels. When temperature increases occur, it can affect a plant’s ability …show more content…
In the Philippines they established a Climate Change Commission. The policy of this organization is, “to ensure mainstreaming of climate change in national, local, and sectoral development plans towards a climate-resilient and climate-smart Philippines” (Climate Change Commission). Within this group exists many various events and programs for community to participate in. In the month of November there is an outreach event for the youth to engage them in learning about climate change, and service projects done to allow to participate in beneficial environment activities (Climate Change …show more content…
The Environmental Protection Agency mentions many ways a person can provide relief in the impacts of climate change. Many might know the cliché ways of doing this, such as turning lights off when you leave a room, or turning the faucet off while brushing your teeth. One method that is not as widely used is composting. It is projected that in the world, food losses and waste amounts are priced at US$ 680 billion in industrialized countries and in developing countries, up to US$ 310 billion (Gustavsson, 6). With these staggering numbers, the EPA notes that composting garbage not only releases less methane from landfills, but also reduces the need to treat plants with chemicals. This practice is beneficial for the continuous interdependent variables that experience the effects of climate change; the earth, and

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