Classroom Management Plan Analysis

1320 Words 6 Pages
An effective classroom management plan is pertinent to building productive and successful learning environments. To achieve this, teachers must base their pedagogies and approaches on evidence based theory that underpins positive student behaviour, and promotes respectful, engaging and rich learning experiences (O’Neill & Stephenson, 2011, p. 35). There are a range of models that have been created by theorists who have studied behaviour and why misbehavior and disengagement occurs. In order to draw on theory as a basis for classroom management, it is essential that teachers understand the important elements that make up each model, and how they align with their own personal teaching philosophy (Lyons, Ford & Slee, 2014). By highlighting key …show more content…
Choice Theory (CT), developed by William Glasser, explains that behaviour is at the core of the individual, and a direct reflection of the want to satisfy five psychological needs; survival, love and belonging, power, freedom and fun (Porter, 2000, p. 140). It is essential that the classroom is equipped in providing students with a quality education that nurtures these five needs, as this will in turn motivate students to achieve their goals, and to make positive behavioural choices (Erwin, 2005, p. 19). CT which is influenced by the psychoeducational theory, is strong in reasoning that once a student knows that their needs are being met and are able to be a part of decision making in regards to their education, they are more likely to actively engage in the learning process (Hale & Maola, 2011, p. 110). A classroom that is sufficient in fulfilling these needs, will create less opportunities for misbehavior to occur. A major weakness of the theory, is that unless it is applied across the whole school, teachers may take different approaches and viewpoints toward student behaviour (Lyons, Ford & Slee, 2014). Interestingly, Irvine (2015) states that a majority of teachers have not acquired specific understanding of the benefits of CT, as there is not enough information regarding its success and implementation in the classroom (p.11). In order to gain quintessential positives …show more content…
Joseph Kaplan and Jane Carter, who are associated with Cognitive Behavioural Theory (CBT), believe that individuals are capable to make personal choices about their behaviour, and that with sufficient support and guidance, can control their feelings and emotions in order to perform academically (Lyons, Ford & Slee, 2014). Through CBT, the individual becomes motivated to want to be self-rewarded and can recognise the need to achieve through the building of self-esteem (Bentley, n.d, p. 3). Therefore, a major strength of CBT is that once a student develops self-control and the ability to alter their own personal behaviour, the teacher’s role in misbehavior prevention is reduced (Lyons, Ford & Slee, 2014). Additionally, CBT can be used for difficult behaviour, to mature social skills, decrease anger issues and prevent disengagement from learning (Texas Statewide Leadership for Autism Training [TSLAT], 2011). Despite these strengths, a downfall of CBT is that the student must be able to see behavioural success, and be able to individually process that they are able to exhibit self-control (Porter, 2000, p. 72). An approach that is repetitive and tedious, may result in a student becoming discouraged or not motivated enough to change

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