Education Vs Progressive Education

1276 Words 5 Pages
In today’s fast-paced society, no one ever takes a moment to pause and question the purpose of education. Everyone simply assumes that education’s aim is to get employed. Although there is a great need for STEM employees across the nation, countless jobs continue to be vacant. This comes as a result of the applicants not meeting the non-STEM skills that many of the employers are looking for in an employee. One may be able to perform tasks properly, however they lack many qualities such as critical thinking, time management, problem solving, teamwork, and the ability to network with people in the field. A liberal arts education, rooted in a civic-based approach, does not aim to train students for a certain career, it offers students the opportunity …show more content…
Dewey’s educational philosophy called for students to engage in their community in order to learn, almost calling for education to be a tool of politics. David L. Palmer, who focuses in critical theory with a concentration in education, and his colleague Christina Standerfer in their article, “Employing Civic Participation in College Teaching Designs,” argues that there is a direct correlation between education and democracy. Palmer and Standerfer assert, “Traditional education situates student learning prior to real-world application, a practice Dewey (1985) labels ‘objective teaching.’ Students are taught to gain a technical understanding of concepts prior to translating the ideas into purposeful action” . In that regard, Dewey’s view of education called for a class setting that exemplified democratic ideals, in which the student and the teacher had an equal say and participation in the classroom. Students and teachers learned side by side, catering to the needs and interests of the student. In making education democratic, Dewey called for freedom articulated through class discussion and common values that result from community …show more content…
Lasch explains Dewey’s thinking when he states, “The knowledge needed by any community—whether it was a community of scientific inquirers or a political community—emerged only from ‘dialogue’ and ‘direct give and take’” . Thus, if schools allow their students to engage in the community, they will be able to pinpoint certain issues facing the community and possibly find ways to address them. Unfortunately, so many people in today’s society are too concerned about advancing financially and pursuing their own interests that they become unconcerned with the moral and social consequences that may arise. Therefore, when individuals are too involved in gaining employment and advancing themselves, they abandon all moral obligations to their community. Hence, even with no community, it appears as if there is cooperation. Michael J. Sandel in Democracy 's Discontent: America in Search of a Public Philosophy addresses the loss of community, identity, and democracy and the relation between the three. Sandel argues, “The industrial system was a cooperative scheme in the sense that it coordinated the efforts of many individuals; but unless the individuals took an interest in the whole and regarded its activity as an expression of their identity, it did not constitute a genuine community” . Democracy is only successful with individuals who can

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