Ecotourism And Tourism

2308 Words 10 Pages
Ecotourism is closely linked to the preservation and conservation of natural areas. This paper will look at two regions, the Annapurna Conservation Area (ACA) in Nepal and the Mkomazi National Park in Tanzania. The two regions have both implemented conservation initiatives, and have a strong relationship with tourism. This paper will examine community conservation in the ACA (ACA) that draws on Hulme and Murphree 's (1999) idea of “new conservation”, which involves “the merging of conservation and development goals”, conservation to be “based in society” and the notion that the “achievement of conservation goals requires that ‘people and parks’ be good neighbours “ (Hulme and Murphree, 1999, p.280). Additionally, it will examine an older fortress …show more content…
To evaluate which methods leads to a better practice of ecotourism, the two concepts of conservation will be compared using studies from the ACA (ACA) in Nepal and the Mkomazi National Park in Tanzania. Firstly, to understand the importance of conservation methods and the association to tourism the relationship between tourism and conservation, with focus on ecotourism, in the ACA (ACA) and Mkomazi National Park,Tanzania will be explored. The concept of tourism as an essential component of economic value, social change and environmental conservation and protection is exemplified in these regions. To begin with, Nepal is known globally by ecotourists, “It is one of the most adventurous cultural and ecotourism destinations in the world, which depends on the quality of the natural environment” (K.C., Rijal, & Sapkota, 2015, p.252). …show more content…
This initiative was a process of “extensive rehabilitation of the infrastructure of the Reserve, activities bolstered by local community involvement and projects linked to wildlife protection” ( Tanzania: Mkomazi National Park, n.d.). In terms of looking at the potential to help the wildlife in the park, for which Mkomazi is admired for, this project can be seen as a successful outcome. Resulting from the fortress approach, various negative impacts have occurred, as argued by Wells (2003), “Traditional parks often involved evicting people from areas designated as protected areas, based on conservationists’ view that human activities were incompatible with ecosystem conservation. Many protected area neighbours lost their livelihoods and their homes as a result.” (Wells, 2003). This statement is visible within the history of the Mkomazi National Park, “In 1988, all residents were evicted after a history of increasing in-migration and growing conservation concern.” (Homewood and Brockington, 1999, p.302). This was a significant occurrence in the Mkomazi National Park, although thought research it has been stated that the evictions may have not been physical built restraints, but though politics and policy that was created

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