Economic Factors Of The Industrial Revolution

998 Words 4 Pages
After the American Revolution, the United States underwent a decade of political and economic unrest under the rule of the Articles of Confederation. Then, our nation adopted the Constitution. The document reshaped our nation economically, politically, and socially, from a vulnerable, divided nation to a powerful, stable nation. However, now, our nation had a traditional economic system, which focused mainly on agriculture, and enormous resources that waited to be exploited (lecture October 25). As the United States approached the nineteenth century, the economy changed dramatically, for the industrial revolution in America had commenced. This period started in 1790 and ended in 1860, before the Civil War in 1861, moreover, historians also …show more content…
To increase the population, the rate of natural increase and immigration must increase. From 1790 to 1840, the population increased from four million to seventeen million (Text 103). Such impressive growth was the result of higher birth rate and improvements in public healthcare, thus decreasing death rate (Text 103). Nevertheless, the morality in the South was high, especially, African Americans who constituted a great portion of the population (Text 103). Immigrants, prior to this period, made up only a small portion of the population, however, “immigration began to grow once again … In particular, the number of immigrants arriving from the southern (Catholic) counties of Ireland began to grow” (Text 103). Because of these three factors, the population in the United States increased at a remarkable speed. Thus, it led to the growth of cities, where majority the immigrants chose to settle. Yet, the urbanization mostly happened in the free states. Therefore, in this period, the population and cities grew with an unprecedented speed, however, the population mainly distributed in the …show more content…
Factories grew dramatically with approximately 140,000 factories in 1860, however, half of them gathered in the Northeast (Text 109). Because of the growth of the industry, manufacturing technology advanced. For instance, the principle of interchangeable parts, “revolutionize watch and clock making, the manufacturing of locomotives, the creation of steam engines, and the making of many farm tools” (Text 109). Moreover, the using of coal in factories allowed certain industries to expand far from their original power sources (Text 110), but also improved not only the mining

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