Economic Causes Of Tudor Rebellions

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Register to read the introduction… The revolt of the Northern Earls was caused by the gentry: Northumberland and Cumberland against William Cecil. In the same way, Pilgrimage of Grace had a subsidiary cause of faction. Henry’s divorce with Catherine of Aragon and disinheritance of Mary alarmed the Aragonist faction. This implied that they would lose power in court without Catherin or Mary on crown. Northumberland and Cumberland demanded the return of political power in the north and wealth as this would ensure a restoration of their influence in the government in the northern counties and increase their financial and political fortunes. To finish, Essex’s rebellion was a weak revolt against Elizabeth and Robert Cecil. Essex’s revolt was his last attempt to restore his influence after his humiliating defeat and barging in to Elizabeth’s bedchamber without her permission. Another reason was because Essex had been banned from court and lost his control on sweet patent wines and has seen Cecil has his rival to rise over him. The Tudors experienced factional rebellions due to the one factor being favoured over the other, the need to overthrow the current ruler and for personal reason such as power and fortune. This shows that the issue of faction was more seen as threatening compared to economic and social issue. This proves that economic and social issue were subsidiary cause compared to faction who can be seen as a main …show more content…
Similar to Northern Earls, Kett rebelled against the lack of quality of preachers and residential incumbents in their diocese. Wyatt, on the other hand, downplayed religion and highlighted faction but motivated by religious grievances against Mary. 8 out of 14 leaders in Wyatt’s rebellion were protestant and supported for the rising in Maidstone where Mary’s martyrs came from. Therefore, religion was an important source of discontent after Henry VIII’s reign up to Elizabeth’s reign. Henry VII did not encounter such problems as he focused on the improvement and the stability of the crown and the economy of

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