Ecological Footprint Analysis

1061 Words 4 Pages
2) Biocapacity is the ability of the natural ecosystem to renew what people demand from it. Human demands include agricultural output as well as the ability for the ecosystem to absorb the waste that is generated by humans. Ecological Footprint on the other hand is how much area of biologically productive land and water is required per individual to produce all of the resources it consumes and to absorb the waste it generates. The biocapacity of a region is likely to change over time for many reasons. The first could be a change in climate. The more productive land is, the higher the biocapacity of the area is. With the effects of global warming, this is likely to diminish the biocapacity of regions over time as harsher climates make land less …show more content…
In regards to social factors, the wealthier a nation is, the higher its Ecological Footprint will likely be. With more money to spend, citizens of these wealthier countries have the means to buy more environmentally intensive products that increase Ecological Footprint. For example, these countries are more likely to buy automotives than a poorer country. Since automotives require much more land to produce, from steel mining for the chassis to cattle herding for leather, the Ecological Footprint of the wealthier nation will increase dramatically. Socially, the Footprint is affected by the the values of citizens in respective nations. If the citizens value ecological conservation, buying products produced locally and sustainably, the Ecological Footprint of the nation is likely to be smaller than that of a nation which doesn’t hold these values. Also, a social value of minimalism will decrease the Footprint as the citizens rely on less, ergo requiring less land to fulfill their needs. Lastly, politics also factors into the Ecological Footprint. Policies can be created within a country that assist in lowering the Ecological Footprint. Such methods can provide tax incentives to companies who use suitable energy methods and by further incentivizing a conservative approach to consumerism while placing an increased value on how the product was produced with regards to how …show more content…
Economic, political and social factors all affect the Greenhouse Emissions of individuals. Economically, there is a tri-fold distinction in how the strength of an economy affects the Greenhouse Emissions. At the lowest tier are the poor nations whose citizens can not afford the products that produce Greenhouse Emissions to begin with. The citizens of these nations have a low Total Greenhouse Gas Emissions as they have low car per capita rates and lack the infrastructure to purchase other commodities, like meats, that would drive up their Emissions. The next highest economic tier has the basic infrastructure and income to buy increasingly environmentally detrimental items that add to their Greenhouse Gas Emissions. Through inefficient heating, automobiles, meat consumption and and lack of recycling systems, the Greenhouse Emissions of these citizens skyrockets. The last, and highest economic tier possess all the same products as those on the tier below them, yet they are more advanced. These nations generally have an increased focus to promote smaller Total Greenhouse Emissions. Their citizens usually use cleaner energy produced through government incentives to use alternative energy. The government allows or mandates citizens to use recycling methods. Also, the products that the citizens use are much more efficient, therefore requiring

Related Documents