Ecclesiastes Stealing The Truth Analysis

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Ecclesiastes Revealing the Truth The book of Ecclesiastes has been said to have occurred between the fifth and third centuries BCE in Persia. Scholars have placed emphasis on the fifth century BCE period because it was a time where commercialization thrived and the standardization of currency occurred. Introducing the problem of unequal wealth distribution which is why it’s been considered the “dark age” in the history of Israel. However, it wasn’t the first time money was introduced and the Persians introducing this coinage caused a drastic change in the economy of Levant. It became a commodity and paved the way for destruction in mankind as well. There is one speaker in the book of Ecclesiastes and it’s not God. Ecclesiastes translated …show more content…
That world is full of contradictions, paradoxes, and reproducing problems at the speed of light. He explains that nothing that humans have is reliable and where nothing is guaranteed. Qoheleth’s view on life may seem very pessimistic, but his words are true. He wants to add his wisdom to help reduce life’s accidents even though their occurrence is inevitable. That’s what it means to be “living under the sun” and that’s why both chapters four and six begin with ‘under the sun’. The characters in both chapters are the same with Qoheleth being the preacher and guiding us through his thoughts of the human existence. Characterizing Qoheleth has pessimistic, but also helpful since he’s trying to alleviate mankind of this pain and help them get closer to God. Mankind could is also playing a part of the characters after all this is a message about them for them. Chapter four as mentioned before begins its first verse, “Again I saw all the oppressions that are practiced under the sun,” describing it in a negative way to display the social aversion between the ones being oppressed and the oppressors. The first verse continues to display the pain the oppressed are in …show more content…
The irony in this is that in Proverbs 31:8-9 a king’s mandate was to speak for those who can’t and defend the powerless. Qoheleth is trying to add his wisdom about the unjust issues of the world, but fails to mention the value of human life. One of God’s Ten Commandments is ‘Thou shalt not kill’ which emphasizes the value of human life. In verses 4:2-3 the value of human life is greatly depreciated. “Qoheleth considers the advantage of death over life. Death spares the individual from having to witness ‘all the oppressions under the sun’” (Brown, 49.) Death is considered bliss and Qoheleth wasn’t the only one who desired it, Jeremiah and Job wished for it as well in Job 3:3-36 and Jeremiah 20:14-18. From verses 4:1-3 the theme is oppression and from verses 4:4-6 the theme changes to toil. Toil is defined as exhausting labor which for Qoheleth is not perceived in a negative way. He explains that the motivation for that toil is what is destructive. ‘All toil and all skin in work come from one person’s envy of another. This is vanity and chasing after the wind.’ The reason one only works hard is because they’re

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