Eating Disorders Case Study

2006 Words 9 Pages
In current day America we live in an age where information and knowledge are always at our disposal. Whether it is through phones, television, or the internet, we are always connected. However, despite all the available information and knowledge we as a country are not using it to become as healthy as possible. We rank seventeenth out of seventeen developed countries in a recent study done by the National Research Council and Institute of Medicine of the National Academics (Rubenstein, 2013). The culture that we live in should be home to a number of healthy practices due to this incredible amount of knowledge we have, but it is not. Among the many unhealthy practices, eating disorders pose a large threat to our society, especially in the …show more content…
Despite this, there are however many agreed upon risk factors for developing an eating disorder. The single biggest risk for developing an eating disorder is being female. The average female with an eating disorder is a young, middle-upper class, white woman who lives in a westernized culture. It is emphasized in this review that in western culture there is a focus on the female beauty ideal of extreme thinness and objectification of the female body. According to the study, we live in a time in which we highly value thinness, and social pressure to conform to this norm has led to a reoccurring theme of distorted body image. Due to this it can be concluded that eating disorders are common in individuals who are vulnerable psychologically (example: adolescent females) (Striegel-Moore & Bulik, 2007 ). The authors in this particular review concluded that there is strong evidence to support that there are biological and environmental factors that play a role in the psychology behind developing eating disorders (Striegel-Moore & Bulik, 2007 …show more content…
Many researchers believe that the media creates a “thin ideal” which women strive to obtain. For example, it is true that there is a parallel increase in the number of United States eating disorder cases to the number of articles and advertisements in media outlets (Wiseman, Gray, Mosimann, & Ahrens, 1992). In 1992 a team of researchers led by Eric Stice used this idea and aimed to determine whether or not the media had a direct effect on the pathology of eating disorders. The researchers used a pool of 238 female undergraduates. The female undergrads completed a questionnaire. The questionnaire was ten pages and contained sections titled media exposure, gender-role endorsement, idea-body stereotype internalization, body dissatisfaction, and eating disorder symptomology. The researchers found that media exposure did have a direct effect on eating disorder symptoms. They concluded that the internalization of sociocultural pressures mediates the effect of the “thin ideal” (Stice, Schupak-Neuberg, Shaw, & Stein, 1994

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