Dystopian Texts In Kazuo Ishiguro's 'Never Let Me Go'

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Dystopian texts are an engagine medium for conveying political ideas to contemporary vieweres. ONe of the most prevalent aspects of the typical Dystopia is advanced technology, a characteristics which is becoming increaseingly true for our world. Composers of Dystopian texts aim to bring attention to the political exploitation of individuals, and it is the similarity between Dystopian worlds and our own which allows for the conveyance of this idea so effectively. Kazuo Ishiguro’s novel Never Let Me Go is a modern example of a text which explores this idea. Ishiguro is writing for a modern audience and so chooses to use clones as an allegory for an explooited group of people. Another text with similar context is the film ‘The Matrix’, directed by the Wachowski Brothers. This text uses the setting itself as the main medium for representation. This film is seemingly set in the modern world, but this setting is actually an elaborate illusion designed by artificial intelligence to reduce humans to a resource. Bothe these texts use ideas inspired by modern technology, allowing for …show more content…
The setting of both Never Let Me Go and The Matrix reflects the extremes of possible negative connotations which current technological trends could impose on society, and it is this relation to the modern world which makes Dystopian texts so engaging. Political exploitation of the individual is an issue whcih needs to be considered, and the texts explore various aspects of the idea. The means for such a system, socially conditioning a group of people into either ignorance or willing passivity, is presented to the reader in a manner which brings it into a present context. Due to the parallels between many of the typical Dystopian elements and the moder world, Dysopian texts are especially suited for conveying political ideas to a contemporary

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