Dysthymia Case Study

807 Words 4 Pages
“Dysthymia is an under-diagnosed mood spectrum disorder that is almost as common as major depression and, if left untreated, has a chronic course which can impact negatively on a patient’s quality of life” (Moch, 2011). Dysthymic disorder is a milder, more chronic form of depression that usually has an early onset, such as in childhood or adolescence, and last at least two years in length for adults and one year in length for children (Knippa, 2011). There are two forms of this disorder. Acute onset is when symptoms appear before the age of twenty one. In late onset, symptoms appear after the age of twenty one and are usually in response to some kind of event (Moch, 2011). The difference in dysthymic disorder and major depression is that …show more content…
In clients with dysthymic disorder symptoms of depression are in their everyday lives. People with this disorder have never had a major depressive episode and they do not show any signs of manic behavior. People with this disorder have an ongoing struggle with the symptoms associated with dysthymic disorder throughout their lifetime. The person with dysthymic disorder often has a pessimistic attitude due to their feelings of emptiness, inadequacy, and failure in life. This client is often ineffective at coping with loss. These people may resort to substance abuse, shopping sprees, acting-out, or sexual promiscuity to escape the mental pain associated with this disorder because they are unable to cope with their ongoing feelings of despair. Their feelings of hopelessness can lead to thoughts of …show more content…
These nonpharmacologic therapies require time and dedication to be successful. They usually require weekly appointments for at least six months. Cognitive therapy identifies, interrupts, and corrects negative thought patterns which promote a self-reinforced critical mindset. Behavioral therapy introduces alternate, positive actions in order to put an end to learned helplessness, effects of stress, and deficient social skills. Interpersonal therapy develops sensitivity to social roles and provides techniques for dealing with separation, losses, and disputes (Moch,

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