Who Is Explored In William Faulkner's Intruder In The Dust

1004 Words 4 Pages
The Malicious South Hatred and violence flow throughout society in a similar fashion as the deep red blood within our veins. Unfortunately, before the civil rights movement, there were sadistic reactions to occurrences involving interracial affairs were more like a waterfall. William Faulkner explored and shared his knowledge of society first through Intruder in the Dust and in several other novels following. Faulkner reveals what the majority, the whites, do in reaction to events and how they simply place the blame on the weak and defenseless minorities. This exploration into society through fictional stories, often with nonfictional influences, informs many of the reality they live in. William Faulkner explores multiple cog like components …show more content…
As quite often many were persecuted simply by their skin color, Faulkner expressed much more interesting and in depth stories than society had to offer. Faulkner lived within the horribly cruel and unjust society for many, especially the minorities. Within Intruder in the Dust “not having injured his fellow so much as having been wrong” within society is the greatest scar a man can have (Faulkner 127). This is truly why he has the main character Lucas Beauchamp, a black man on trial for murder, stay silent and noble as he does not want someone else to be persecuted. This expresses the least political of an approach to this novel because he knew he was innocent, but did not fight the …show more content…
Except he does not see the artistic approach, but that Faulkner had “thematic approaches” within his earlier works(Bassett 8). Intruder in the Dust does have an artistic feel and smoothness, yet the suggestion of it being a fable like story just seems like an unbacked allegation to simply describe an abnormal literary work. Thus I believe that Bassett does make valid points and sort of sparks ideas in the mind, he does not fully express this individual book as it should be. I believe that the the harsh reality lived by the characters “can cause more grief” by means artistically, rather than any other method (Faulkner

Related Documents