Drugs And Technology In Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

1261 Words 6 Pages
In our modern era, drugs and technology play increasingly progressive roles. Their presence can bring about positive changes, like medical breakthroughs or long-distance communication, but they also may elicit severe repercussions. If people, from politicians to scientists, begin to abuse substances, humanity may suffer. It can be extremely difficult to understand these dynamics, but Aldous Huxley is one such author who examines the significance and potential of these instruments. In Brave New World, the protagonist, John, having been born on a savage reservation, is introduced to World State, whose motto of “community, identity, [and] stability” is contradictory to the actions they promote. When John realizes the true nature of the state, …show more content…
Huxley experimented with psychedelic drugs and was especially curious about how they could be exploited. In one essay Huxley mentions that “The dictatorships of tomorrow will deprive men of their freedom, but will give them in exchange a happiness nonetheless real, as a subjective experience, for being chemically induced” (Men’s Mind, 1). These ideologies are clearly elaborated upon in both Brave New World and Island, where stimulants play relevant roles in daily lives. Huxley also feels that drugs “may start by being something of an embarrassment, these new mind changers will tend in the long run to deepen the spiritual life of the communities in which they are available” (Men’s Mind, 1). In Island, moksha-medicine works to help connect the people on a spiritual level. Huxley sees stimulants as something that can be helpful and cause positive change in a society, but there may also be negative repercussions when these substances are …show more content…
One form of conditioning is hypnopedia, the act of having repetitive messages spoken during sleep, to encourage ideas the government wants the future generation and class to express and relate to. Hypnopedia functions by establishing order in a predestined manner. Mustapha Mond, a Controller, thinks suggestions are necessary to create successful people, until “at last the child’s mind is these suggestions, and the sum of of the suggestions is the child’s mind… all his life long… all these suggestions are our suggestions’” (Brave, 36). When the characters are experiencing stress, they automatically resort to the sayings that have been told to them their entire life, giving them a sense of comfort due to the familiarity with them. The rely on the words and “suggestions” until they are tied to a governmental idea that is not their own, preventing people from asking questions, protesting, or ever blaming the government. Consequently, the people feel as if they are connected to the controlling body when they are truly disillusioned. Oxygen depletion is another form of conditioning that is brought upon the people even before birth. In one conversation regarding different social classes, Henry Foster, a lab worker, rhetorically asks “‘Hasn’t it occurred to you that an Epsilon embryo must have an Epsilon environment as well as an Epsilon

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