Drug Distribution Case Study

1034 Words 5 Pages
The authors, Curtis and Wendel (2007), characterized drug markets into to categories, the social organization of distribution and the social organization of distribution. The former is in regards to the relationships between sellers and between sellers and buyers (p. 869). With this category, Curtis and Wendel identified three subcategories of social organization of distribution. The first is corporate style organizations which refers to larger drug organizations that involve hierarchy and individuals who specialize in certain jobs. The second is socially bonded organizations which are groups who share common bonds, such as family, outside of their operations. The third is freelance distribution where everyone fends for him / herself. The …show more content…
The franchise model refers to freelancers who operated under larger drug traffickers and operations. Curtis and Wendel described it this way, “Franchising appears to be a form of freelance distribution, but it is in fact the corporate form of distribution adapted to the realities of a changed marketplace” (p. 876). Freelancers worker off commission and were supplied products by the larger organizations, though sellers typically paid 75% to 90% of the retail price of a sale. Each freelancer operated with more freedom compared to those who worked for social organizations because they did not have higher-ups constantly watching them. Because of this, a rise in violence occurred despite efforts from law enforcement.The violence associate with this model is of turf and territorial disputes. Because freelancers worked without constant intervention from organization heads or enforcers, they were free to vie for any territory they wanted despite knowing someone may be selling there. The second model is that of drug deliver mainly dealt with marijuana, though many operations incorporated other drugs. The delivery model had several stages, “One owner purchased the large amounts of marijuana required to keep the service running and received the bulk of the profits. The other owner was responsible for packaging the marijuana for sale and managing the staff and offices” (p. 881). This …show more content…
Though this model reduces violence, agencies should still be concerned with halting the supply of drugs. No, law enforcement agencies should not out-right say, “which to the delivery model because it reduces violence”, they should, however, pull recourses to tracking and tacking down head suppliers, cutting of the source. To me, this would be more effective than using lots resources to solve drug-related violence cases, though agencies should not cease this aspect of the War on Drugs. Still, we can’t completely eliminate drug related violence, law enforcement agencies should attempt to reduce this amount as mush as possible. By straying away from violent models, less people will get hurt, and law enforcement agencies could focus more on taking down the source of drug suppliers while attorneys could focus on prosecuting those convicted of supplying and dealing drugs. I am aware that, as the question stated, the delivery model would make it harder to monitor, detect, and prosecute dealers and suppliers. Despite this, if the level of drug-related violence is reduced, law enforcement could focus and invest more into tracking, infiltrating, and taking down large suppliers. If drug market shifted towards the delivery model, I believe law enforcement agencies would adapt and find ways

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