Drug Court Case Study

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The design of drug court came about to address the underlying cause(s) of criminal acts committed by offenders. Drug addiction and or mental health issues plague many people who found themselves in drug court; therefore, this specialty court’s job is to provide intense supervision and management of those needing treatment. The offenders are regularly tested and mandated to attendance, their participation monitored by a supervising judge. ("Specialty Courts," n.d.)
Additionally, women’s pathways to crime are different from men’s journey to crime. Girls and women run away from abusive situations and meet others willing to exploit them. Often times, criminal behavior happens as a direct result of drug use. E.g., Women and girls engage in prostitution
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The women were charged with a criminal offense either directly or indirectly related to drugs and were deemed eligible to participate in drug court programs. Effectiveness is judged by how many women successfully complete their programs. Results of the studies can lead to support for additional drug court resources in rural communities, aimed at helping women. Social support plays a big role in helping combat drug addiction and can help reduce recidivism rates by those who specifically commit crimes to feed drug addiction or cope with abuse or mental health …show more content…
How effective are drug courts in increasing social support to female addicts living in rural areas?
Theory. Women will respond well to court mandated drug treatment that caters to their specific needs if the treatment is available and offered to them. A woman’s pathway into the criminal justice system is generally less violent than that of men and usually is the result of sexual and or physical violence. Professor Robert Agnew’s General Strain Theory (GST) teaches that strain can present as the result of negative stimuli such as sexual and physical abuse which then lead to negative outcomes for these women.
Methodology/Research Design This proposal’s approach is a descriptive study, survey of questions, posed to volunteers initially mandated to drug court. They were selected at random to help determine if the drug courts outcome measures were indeed effective at meeting their (Drug courts) goals and to learn information about the behavior and other traits that contribute to drug use. The women filled out the survey, placed it in a sealed envelope, and dropped it in a drop box at their local center upon

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