Disease Model Of Relapse

Improved Essays
With the descriptions of both concepts clearly stated, we can now look into which concept better helps in the aid of treatment when it comes to the addicts and their families. Since one of the main reasons addiction is so hard to understand is the relapsing aspect. A relapse is the return to drug use after a drug-free period and can often be triggered by drug-related cues, negative mood or stress, positive mood states or sampling of the drug itself. (Childress 2015) The “disease model” better explains the phenomenon of relapse because a chronic disease is a long-lasting condition that can be controlled but not fully cured. So that being said it is easy to understand why relapse is always possible with an addict because the addiction is never …show more content…
There are cognitive behavioral therapy, contingency management, 12 step facilitation and family therapy. Do to the reasoning that addiction is a progressive disease in place by the “disease model”, there are aftercare precautions the addict must take to stay in recovery. Services such as recovery centers, peer coaching and mentoring and educational and skill training services play an important role in helping an addicted person rebuild a life, avoid relapse and sustain long-term recovery. (Childress 2015) These opportunities help the addict reenter society in a comforting, supporting way while also challenging them to work on better life management and continuing to work on themselves. Survey data released from the Partnership for Drug Free Kids and The New York State Office of Alcoholism and Substane Abuse Services show that 10 percent of all American adults consider themselves to be in recovery from drug or alcohol abuse problems. (Feliz 2012) This study is important because it shows that through the public’s understanding of recovery as a “disease” or a “progressive disease”, millions of Americans whose lives have significantly improved from these treatment programs and are living free from alcohol and other drugs. This understanding leads to more hope in the eyes of an addict in the fact that they know and understand that there is something different about the way that they think and are affected by …show more content…
One of the therapies is called Reality therapy where the client or addict is encouraged to develop more effective behaviors. This theory states that through problem solving the individual can see how a new approach can work they will voluntarily accept it. (Glassner 2015) The “choice theory” believes that the individual or addict responsible for their actions and they will find a path to improve themselves to break away from their addiction because of personal empowerment. There are not many other specific, “choice theory” programs for recovery and treatment. Since the people who believe in the “choice theory” believe that addicts can just decide whether or not they want to quit and can by choice give up all drugs and maintain abstinence, it is easy to see why there is such stigma against the addicts who just do not quit. Since the choice theory is based on rewards and punishments, the actions of an addict do not make sense. If an addict loses their job this is negative action that should show the addict that their addictions need to be addressed but in reality, they do not stop. The same applies to

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Addiction is a disease that has spread into an epidemic. However, this book’s main focus is to ultimately help the struggling addict and their family overcome hardships and successfully find recovery. They will achieve this by using the “six principals of good recovery” that concentrate on both the process and the outcome perspective (Shumway & Kimball, 2012, p.3). The six principals include: hope, healthy coping skills, achievement and accomplishment, capacity for meaningful relationships, unique identity development, and reclamation of agency. The first of the six essentials on the road to recovery is hope, defined as “a reawakening after despair” and “to expect with greater confidence” (Shumway & Kimball, 2012, p.9) When the addict hits…

    • 1371 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Some solutions for alcoholism could be medication, behavioral therapy, and mutual help groups. These plus strong support from family and friends can help people overcome their alcoholism. Some medication available targets the part of brain that is affected during withdrawal to reduce shaking, spasms, and panic often associated with detoxification (WebMD). Another medicine blocks the endorphins that are released while drinking that are responsible for the feel good affect it gives making drinking just a horrible experience (Alcoholism Treatment and Success). Medication would be a good solution because it can be provided everywhere and it takes away part of the reason people drink (the good feeling), and part of the reason people do not quit (withdrawal).…

    • 1597 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Addiction is a chronic disease that can take hold quickly or develop over an extensive period of time. Dependence on drugs or alcohol is characterized by compulsive or uncontrollable urges to use despite any harmful consequences. Although the effects can be long lasting, recovery is achievable with the proper treatment. The best way to recover from an addiction is to build a new lifestyle where it is easier not to use drugs or alcohol. Effective treatment includes several steps that help addicts stop using, stay drug and alcohol free, and be productive in life (NIDA 2016).…

    • 907 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Friends and family members pray and hope that rehab will help change their lives, but relapse is always possible. Addiction is real and it is suitable to know what an addiction is, realize that people are not the same, and to know the truth. Although drug obsession is manageable, prevention would be a better course of…

    • 731 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Living through drug rehabilitation is a tough, but necessary, experience for many people suffering from addiction. However, the hardest part of recovery isn 't rehabilitation: it 's avoiding relapses. If you have suffered from a relapse, you know the emotional devastation and embarrassment it can cause. Don 't let that stop you from treating you relapse with drug rehabilitation. Rehab can help minimize the damage caused by a relapse and get you back on the road to recovery.…

    • 851 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Harm-Reduction Model

    • 1063 Words
    • 4 Pages

    In my opinion, these two strategies are very helpful, but if I had to choose which one I think is the most effective, I would choose the medical model. This model allows individuals to believe that they should not partake in substance abuse any longer, and even though one may relapse they are able to start fresh. Also, I personally believe that addiction is a…

    • 1063 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Relapse does not have to be a part of the recovery process, but it is a reality that many will encounter. The necessity to hit a painful bottom has proven to be a very effective motivator toward a successful recovery. “when the pain of remaining the same becomes greater than the pain of changing, we will change” (Narcotics Anonymous, 1992, pg. 173). There is hope, as the substance user will discover, through the necessary treatment of change.…

    • 1160 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    If support starts in the early days, insurance companies can help people before they reach the point when there is no turning back. By the time insurance companies provide help to the sick, many people have grown deep in their mental illness even to the point of an incurable state. Many attribute shootings and mass killings to this fact. For example, the Tuscan killings may have been avoided if the mentally ill killers had the help they needed (Ollove, "Easiest" n.p.). Not only is mental health care saving the person, but it can also save the lives around them.…

    • 815 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Transformed drug addicts should form new connections which are totally different from their previous ones in order to avoid influences that can easily tempt them back into the life of substance abuse. It is usually wise for a recovering addicts to join a support group of individuals who have recovered from substance abuse to motivate one another, as this transition stage is fragile and difficult, both emotionally and mentally. Associating with sober individuals or friends would tremendously help in the convalescing phase. In addition, it is also mandatory for the improving addicts to redefine, transform and replace their values, feelings, and thinking for them to re-integrate gracefully into a normal social life. Consciously discarding disempowering beliefs, thinking, feelings…

    • 731 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Decent Essays

    That would mean careful consideration for their specific medical concerns. Things like withdrawal medications are almost always necessary in severely addicted individuals. · You should realize that detoxifying the individual is not enough to stop the behavior. The drug rehab clinic needs to handle more than just this process. It needs to look for the long term rehabilitation of the individual.…

    • 476 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays

Related Topics