Dr Seuss Analysis

887 Words 4 Pages
Many have heard of the spectacular stories of Dr. Seuss but some have not heard his own. Dr. Seuss is more commonly known by Theodore Geisel by those who know him. Geisel was always one to try and teach children lessons by persuading their self conscious brains like when he says, “You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself in any direction you choose. You're on your own, and you know what you know. And you are the guy who'll decide where to go.” ("BrainyQuote"). Geisel had some experience making cartoons for PM Magazine during WW2 about politics, which is sometimes dipped into his children's books. Geisel did not become popular fast but he was willing to put in the time and dedication to be where he ended …show more content…
Geisel wrote many books with messages for both adults and children. Geisel stories consisted on the same use of political and ethical ideas and interpretations (THE POLITICAL DR.SEUSS companion Web site, Betsy Hedberg, "PBS", 2016, p. 3). Some may know him better for his lessons in his books but some more for the poetic devices he uses when he writes. Geisel's known for having rhythm like in Oh, the Places You’ll Go! … “Congratulations! Today is your day. You’re off to Great Places! You’re off and away!” (Seuss pg. 1) . Geisel always tried to promote reading to children and a reason why is shown in his quote “The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go.” (BrainyQuote.com, Dr. Seuss, "BrainyQuote", 1904-1991, p. 1). Geisel was not always inspired to write until his first wife Helen Palmer had encouraged him to do what he loved and pursue it making a joy to all of those who read his work. (Random House Children's Book and Dr. Seuss Enterprises, L.P., Philip Nel, "Dr. Seuss | Seussville.com", 2010, p. …show more content…
Seuss is acknowledged for many books and writings, but one of Geisel’s popular books is And to Think I Saw It on Mulberry Street. The speaker of the book is the main character, Marco, who tells his father about his day and what he sees. The conflict becomes visible once Marco states, “Now, what can I say when I get home today?” (Seuss 1). The statement shows that Marco will be searching for something throughout the story to tell his father. As Marco narrates it is shown that he is talking to himself. Geisel uses Marco’s conscience to play out the lesson of the story to the children. Marco was planning on telling his father his big tale of adventures on Mulberry Street when his father stops him and says, “Was there nothing to look at… no people to greet? Did nothing excite you or make your heart beat?” (Seuss 29). Therefore bringing Marco to meet his conscience and think about all the fibs he had created leading him to answer his father’s question, “Nothing”, I said, growing red as a beet, “But a plain horse and wagon on Mulberry Street.” (Seuss 30). Geisel’s interpretation of this story to kids is that, it is okay to have creativity but be sure to be honest in life as

Related Documents