Great Britain's Victory In The Battle Of Britain

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With the fall of France on 22 June 1940, came the shifting of Germany’s attention to the coast of the United Kingdom. Hitler’s strategic goals for the region were dependent on the defeat of Great Britain, the last remaining ally remaining to fight off the Nazi advance through Europe. With this goal came the revision of Great Britain’s strategy in the war, it was simply to survive. While Germany began its raid of the United Kingdom through the air, the British people took to the skies to defend their homeland, in what would be called the Battle of Britain and total war for the British population. Many leaders emerged to rally the people to combat the Nazi attacks, however, crucial to the British victory in the Battle of Britain was Air Chief …show more content…
The effect of this appointment can only be described as magical, and thereafter the Supply situation improved to such a degree that the heavy aircraft wastage which was later incurred during the “Battle of Britain” ceased to be the primary danger.”
Through this logistical overhaul, pilots now had the aircraft needed to wage war against the Germans and combat their advance through the air.
The Battle of Britain was also the proving ground for many new innovations and tactics that were newly introduced to air warfare. This created a new dimension to the ever complex view of aerial combat and forced Allied and Axis leaders to adapt to the changing landscape, a task the Dowding performed well enough to earn victory. One such technological innovation was the creation of the radio detection and ranging, or RADAR. This new piece of technology emitted radio waves; then tracking objects in the air when the radio waves bounced back to the stations. Dowding used this new innovation and created the Chain Home Network, a collection of these RADAR stations to detect and track incoming German aircraft, a crucial advantage for the RAF. Dowding’s ability to adapt new technology to his fight and reorganize resources to effectively utilize this tool helped propel Britain to
…show more content…
Additionally, this aerial battleground became important to the development of new fighters, like the Supermarine Spitfire and the Hawker Hurricane, as well as the refinement of fighter tactics for both the Luftwaffe and the RAF. Dowding’s in-depth understanding of the employment of airpower and the logistics behind deploying the RAF’s aircraft gave him the ability to revitalize the decrepit Air Ministry. He, along with others who sought the need for change to defeat Britain’s enemies, devoted many days to ensuring that Britain had successfully repelled the Nazi, up until that point, unstoppable advance through Europe and protect the citizens requiring their sacrifice, thus influencing the victory of Britain during the Battle of

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