Dow Corning To Breast Implant Research

Amazing Essays
Values 2 Although Dow Corning’s restricted scope of business to breast implant research will prove that its “corporate culture” upholds the medical community’s “network of ethical value,” at the same time it also proves that it failed to maintain its “free expression” and “conservatism” within capitalistic markets (Brooks & Dunn, 2015, 1-530; Pfeiffer & Forsberg, 2014, p. Inside front cover -161). In other words, Dow Corning’s restricted business model could be viewed by the public as an admission of guilt for not pursuing further capitalistic ventures. Even if Dow Corning acted as a controlling shareholder in another company that produced breast implants, the criticism for doing so would be equally harsh as it would be no different than …show more content…
Inside front cover -161). Taking these steps will assist Dow Corning in establishing a corporate “culture of integrity” (Brooks & Dunn, 2015, p. 1-399). Additionally, making these amendments to customers will help Dow Corning to reestablish its legitimacy within the medical community. In order to gain approval for its implementation, this decision will be proposed at the next board meeting and will be reinforced by a SWOT/regression analysis to show its viability for resolving said aforementioned ethical issues, as well as the gained benefits that will result from its integration. Following this pathway will maintain the medical community’s “network of ethical value” (Pfeiffer & Forsberg, 2014, p. Inside front cover -161). The following four questions in combination with the “Ethical Decision Making Framework (EDM)” will further clarify this …show more content…
188). The failure of “corporate governance” can be seen from the lack of an “ethics officer” position within Dow Corning’s corporate organizational infrastructure (Brooks & Dunn, 2015, p. 1-530). Furthermore, having a paid in house management team act as an auditing committee does not remove bias from the auditing process and points directly to “hubris” and/or the “principal-agent problem” as it concentrates on “profit” rather than “ethics” (Sherratt, 2016, p. 188). In other words, having management check the accuracy and ethicality of accountants seems implausible and unethical. Then the question arises of whether these “six managers” are in fact employees in different departments throughout the rest of the year after completing their “six weeks” per year committee work? (Brooks & Dunn, 2015, p. 1-530). The reason this question is being asked is it does not seem likely that Dow Corning would pay a years’ salary for only “six” weeks’ worth of work (Brooks & Dunn, 2015, p. 1-530). If this is the case that these other employees work in other departments during the rest of the year, then this gives rise to other ethical considerations such as “bribery” (Brooks & Dunn, 2015, p. 1-530). This may explain how the “faulty breast implants” were able to make it to market if an employee was paying off one of the auditing managers (Brooks & Dunn, 2015, p.

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