The Similarities Between Dorothea Lange's Life And Work

Superior Essays
Dorothea Lange, was born May 26, 1895 in Hoboken, New Jersey. She was growing up during the depression era. When Dorothea was older she moved to San Francisco and passed away there on October 11, 1965. Her father, Heinrich Nutzhorn, was a lawyer, and her mother, Johanna, stayed at home to raise Dorothea and her brother during this time. When Dorothea was 7 she was diagnosed with polio, this affected her left leg and her foot noticeably weakened. She started walking with a limp. As Dorothea got older she felt thankful for the effects the illness had on her life. She stated “It was the most important thing that happened to me, and formed me, guided me, instructed me, helped me and humiliated me” (Dorothea Lange). When Dorothea was a teen, her …show more content…
Her parents pushed her to be creative. Although Lange never showed any interest in high school and was not the best student, she went to college for photography. She studied art at Columbia University in New York. She then took jobs over the next several years, working for several different photographers. Once she graduated college she moved across the bay in Berkeley for the rest of her life. That is when she started her own personal portrait studio. She was very comfortable taking portraits and that is what she stuck with though in the great depression. She then married a painter, Maynard Dixon. Her husband and her often traveled together, taking photos. 5 years later she had two sons.
The greatest influence in Dorothea’s life was the onset of the Great Depression. At the time Lange was working in her photography studio, although when the depression started she sparked an interest to the streets of the depression. Her studies and photography included the unemployed and homeless people. Dorothea Lange has been called America 's greatest documentary photographer. She is best known for her chronicles of the Great Depression and for her photographs of migratory farm workers. Through her picture of the great depression, people state that they can feel the emotions though her photos and the
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Power farming displaces tenants from the land in the western dry cotton area. Childress County, Texas Panhandle. This is also known as Tractored out. This photo was taken in June of 1938. The photo is a medium of silver gelatin and 9 15/16 in. x 13 in. (25.24 cm x 33.02 cm). The meaning behind this photo is something that most men could relate to at the time. To be tractored out meant losing your job or land. To afford a tractor, a farmer had to produce much more that most couldn’t afford, this meant men had to farm more ground. These technological and economic realities produced a new social reality, farmers who were forced to get bigger or to get out. Farmers who didn 't own the land they farmed – known as tenants – were often "tractored out, due to the more production of land and tractors. This was taking in the dust bowl era of the great depression. I chose to incorporate this into my lessons to show the hardship of jobs, land and the dust

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