Dorian Wilde And Oscar Wilde's The Picture Of Dorian Gray

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Oscar Wilde’s classic novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray has been adapted into many film, T.V. shows, and specials since its publication. Detail changes in the movie adaptation Dorian Gray (2009) portrays a more innocent Dorian than The Picture of Dorian Gray. From the beginning, Dorian Gray creates sympathy for the title character by emphasizing his traumatic childhood. The film shows awful scars across Dorian’s back while Basil is painting him, encouraging the audience to pity the young boy. In addition, Dorian has multiple quick flashbacks of the abuse his grandfather inflicted on him. There is very little mention of Dorian’s upbringing in the novel, and almost no hint of past trauma until midway through the book. Even then, the novel …show more content…
In the novel, Lord Henry almost immediately makes the statement “all influence is immoral,” and continues his monologue on the evils of influence (Wilde 2). This serves as a kind of “no offense but…” statement for Lord Henry. He declares that he is against influencing others yet continually influences Dorian throughout the entirety of the novel, giving readers the impression that he is not purposely influencing Dorian. However, this important sentiment is absent in the film adaptation Dorian Gray. This makes Lord Henry out to be a much more untrustworthy character than he already is. Also, Dorian Gray shows Lord Henry peer pressuring Dorian to do things such as smoke and have sex much more so than the novel. These differences in Lord Henry’s character ultimately result in the audience of Dorian Gray placing more blame on Lord Henry for Dorian’s downfall than readers of The Picture of Dorian Gray …show more content…
In the film, James Vane chases Dorian into a train tunnel in an attempt to kill the man who caused his sister’s demise. As James is finally about to get his revenge on Dorian, a train speeds down the tracks, gruesomely injuring him. When Dorian sees this, he rushed to James, attempting to cover his wounds. There is even a look of sympathy and remorse on Dorian’s face as he assists the man who was trying to kill him. This shows a much more human side of Dorian, allowing the audience to have pity on him. When compared to Dorian’s reaction to James’s death in the novel of “his eyes were full of tears, for he knew he was safe,” (Wilde 18). the film Dorian Gray portrays a much more innocent

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