Domestic Violence In Intimate Relationships

1054 Words 5 Pages
Domestic Violence is one of the largest red flags in intimate relationships, where women specifically have difficulties of leaving their abusive partners. According to Coltrane and Adams “we live in a culture that romanticizes violence in general and relationship violence in particular, so that “being hit” is often mixed up with “being loved.” The media such as movies, songs, novels, and greeting cards continually remind individuals that belonging to (or owning) another is the height of romance (Coltrane and Adams). Throughout history, there are notions of patriarchy, property and privacy that goes into traditional family, creating almost a barrier that tended to keep the state from interfering in family life (Coltrane and Adams). Domestic …show more content…
In a general subject, family violence can be sexual, verbal, emotional, psychological, material and even financial (Coltrane and Adams). The experience of physical abuse tends to create psychological trauma, whereas for battered it can involve a combination of physical abuse which is exploiting them sexually, isolating them family, friends, and professionals that are potential sources of support, also implementing a regime of regulation over everyday affairs (Coltrane and Adams). Many researchers studied that domestic violence involves a systematic pattern of behavior on the part of the abuser intended to maintain control over the victim on a number of different. There are different cycles and levels that the abuser can control the woman, and signs that women do not realize in their …show more content…
Ferraro investigates on why women stay with their abusers, and the strategies for survival. The outlines the stages of engagement and disengagement of the intimate relationship of which battered women participate. The stages are ardor, accommodation, ambivalence and terror (Ferraro). In the first stage of ardor, it would often include the increase of isolation of the woman from her friends and family. Also in the stage of ardor, the women “usually enjoys the time alone with her partner and does not perceive his desire for social exclusivity as oppressive or abusive but an expression of their mutual affection” (Ferraro). The woman is flattered by her partner in the first stage, but the isolation that begins to occur in this phase, may establish conditions that facilitate the batterer’s efforts to control his partner later

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