Does Hamlet Truly Love Ophelia Essay

950 Words Oct 31st, 2012 4 Pages
Does Hamlet Truly love Ophelia?
In William Shakespeare’s Hamlet, many arguments have been argued as to whether or not Hamlet is really in love with Ophelia. I believe that there is a lot of evidence arguing that Hamlet never loved Ophelia and that he was just using her. By the way he acts around Ophelia when he is alone with her, he shows that his feelings for her are true. Hamlet shows throughout the play that he is really in love with Ophelia.
One piece of evidence showing that Hamlet really did love Ophelia is when he tells her, “I did love you” (Act 3 scene 1 line 126). Hamlet confesses that he truly loved her, but then goes back on his word and says he never loved. I think this could be the fact that Hamlet knows people are
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Another example of Hamlet’s love for Ophelia is the letter he sends her. One line Hamlet writes her is “never doubt I love” (Act 2 scene 2 line 127). This letter is the clearest proof of Hamlet’s love for Ophelia. At this point of the play Hamlet is able to express his true and honest feeling because he knows that Ophelia will be the only recipient of this letter. He tells her that among everything else around her that may not be true, his love for her is real. This is the one time before Ophelia’s death that Hamlet reveals his true feelings. This could be the fact that, once Ophelia received the letter, she gave it to her father. Hamlet did not trust Polonius, and from that moment on, Hamlet knew he had to hide his love for Ophelia and act insane to protect her. As the play progresses, Hamlet is not able to express his love openly because his every move is being watched.
The last example which proves that Hamlet’s love for Ophelia is true is when he finds out that she is dead. In the graveyard, Hamlet confronts Laertes about his accusations that he never loved Ophelia. Hamlet responds by saying: “I loved Ophelia. Forty thousand brothers could not with all their quantity of love make up my sum” (Act 5 scene 1 lines 285-287). Hamlet has no reason to defend his love for Ophelia now that she is dead, but he still does. Hamlet really did love Ophelia, and tells Laertes, “Be buried quick with her, and so will I” (Act

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