Do You Agree with the View That, in the Years 1511-27, English Successes in Foreign Policy Outweighed the Failures?

711 Words Jan 28th, 2014 3 Pages
Do you agree with the view that, in the years 1511-27, English successes in foreign policy outweighed the failures?

I agree with the view that English successes in foreign policy outweighed the failures in the years 1511-27 to a certain extent. England managed to successfully pursue a policy of peace making in the years 1514-21 and wolsey was flexible in his diplomacy. However, it could also be argued that Henry’s chief aim, the invasion of France, was unpopular with people at the time and that Henry’s foreign policy was too costly given how little of long term value it brought to England. His allies also often let him down and put their own aims before those of England. In this essay I will be looking at three sources and weighing up
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This suggests that an invasion of France was unpopular with people at the time. Further evidence to support this is the failure of the Amicable Grant of 1525. Wolsey set about raising funds to invade France by attempting to levy a tax, without the approval of parliament. This led to protests and refusal to pay, showing that people at the time were not willing to finance an invasion of France.

Another point against the view that success in foreign policy outweighed the failures is that Henry’s foreign policy was too costly. We learn this from Source 6 where Armstrong calls English foreign policy ‘short-sighted, costly and out of date’. He refers to how little even the successful campaigns of 1512-13 brought to England and tells us that £1.4 million was spent on wars in the years 1511-25, money Armstrong considers was ‘squandered’. English tax revenue was vastly inferior to that of France or the Empire, because of England’s much smaller population.

Source 6 is against the view that success in foreign policy outweighed the failures, as it suggests that Henry’s allies often let him down. Armstrong tells us that Charles V, when allied with Henry, increasingly pursued his own aims and ambitions after 1521. Further evidence of this is in

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