Do Storm Chasers Measure The Speed Of A Tornado

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For my essay, I am going to write about tornadoes. My question is how do storm chasers measure the speed of a tornado? The first topic I will be telling you about is the F scale. Did you know the person who invented the F scale went to the University of Chicago. The second topic is about tornadoes and about 1,200 tornadoes hit the U.S. each year. My final topic is over storm chasers. I learned that storm chasers park southeast of the tornado because usually it is the safest place to park. There are two different types of scales.The F scale was developed by Dr. Theodore Fujita. After the tornado hits, they give it its category by how bad of damage it does to the earth. The other scale is the EF. It is also just a more detailed scale than the F. The difference between the F scale and the EF scale is we use the EF scale mainly in the United States. Now I am going to tell the different categories of them. A F0 40-72 mph, F1 73-112 mph, F2 113-157 mph, F3 158-206 mph, F4 207-260 mph, and F5 261-318 mph. An EF0 65-85 mph, EF1 86-110 mph, EF2 111-135 mph, EF3 136-165 mph, EF4 166-200 mph, and EF5 is over 200 mph. …show more content…
The first stage is the wind shear and the wind changes direction over a given a distance. For the tornado to develop, the wind shear has to reach a height, speed, and wind. Next is the updraft stage, it lifts when fronts and low pressure troughs. Then the storm stage and it is a large disturbance to the earth, which usually comes with rain, hail, lightning and thunder, and sometimes snow. Finally, the last stage is the supercell and this is when the tornado usually forms. The first couple of signs for a storm is it goes from light rain to heavier rain and then to hail. Some tornadoes that you might know is the Andover tornado in 1991, Oklahoma tornado in 1999, and the South Dakota in 1884. There are still a whole lot more but that is only a

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