Divine Transcendence And Divine Imanence

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The co-authors of 20th Century Theology, Stanley Grentz & Roger Olson developed in the contemporary age and how they saw the divine transcendence and divine immanence, from the Evangelical point of view. Evangelical theology has had some rough road it had to stay balance accordingly to, the divine transcendence and divine immanence of its biblical truth. The authors are thinkers of the twentieth century the task of the magnitude of how theology has become a voice of the transcendence and immanence God that has become a great significance of the future and to balance the two points of transcendence and immanence. Postmodernity covers a broad range of concerns, but one aspect of it has been especially influential in shaping …show more content…
Accordingly to Grentz and Olson theologians must constantly work to achieve a balance perspective. They presented to that the relationship between the two, immanence and transcendence was “central theological concern” contributing to the determined specifically theological taken the path in the last hundred years (Grentz & Olson, 1992). They speak of transcendence as God’s self-containment and the fact that He is apart from the world. They refer to immanence as the presence of God, within humankind (Grentz & Olson, 1992). The Bible present God as both beyond the world and the presence to the world, theologians in every era are confronted with the challenge of articulating the Christian understanding of the nature of God in a manner that balances, affirms and holds in creative tension between the two of the divine transcendence and the divine immanence (Gentz & Olson, 1992). It would be essential to balance these two together for the sake of a relationship with theology and to reason with as well for the sake of cultural context. Whereas too much attention on immanence may result in cultural captivity, such as theological liberalism, monism. Grentz …show more content…
Henry and B. Ramm two evangelical theologians, they had many who people who did not agree with their traditional views on transcendence and immanence. Furthermore Grentz and Olson believe that the Bible is the divine words of God and that Jesus Christ is the testimony that is known to all God’s people. They believe the Bible is the truth and is not at any fault, it is to reveal the truth of God’s work and the scripture is the testimony of Jesus and for mankind. Henry believes “the doctrine of the Bible controls all others doctrine of Christian faith” (Grentz & Olson, 1992). Henry also believes the deity arises solely out of the divine self-disclosure found in the Scriptures. God is God as He shows Himself in the Bible (Grentz & Olson, 1992). The transcendence is of great importance to Henry because he believes that God speaks to His people. Grentz and Olson believes the Bible is accurate and reliable. For the understanding to balance Christian to learn the nature of God to foresee and facilitate and affirm the truth of the immanence and transcendence, which balance the two to a proper relation with reason. This new movement aids in the understanding for Christian to come together with knowledge and love for each cultural to build a unity between the two. When

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