Disparate Dress Codes And Sex Discrimination

1658 Words 7 Pages
One in five women will be raped in their lifetime. This statistic can be unnerving to some, but to others it is just a number. Although rape is such a large problem in our society, it seems to have become a normality and consequence of life. Girls are being taught to cover up their bodies to protect themselves, while boys are being taught that sexual violence is a byproduct of natural instincts. The use of terms like “boys will be boys” shows that there is a lack of discipline for boys’ harassment. The term “boys will be boys” justifies the actions of males, while terms like “"she was asking for it" blame females. This sends the message that both women and even young girls should claim responsibility for not dressing properly, or leading on …show more content…
In 1980, dress codes in the workplace were found to be sexist and lead to women’s objectification, due to the fact that dress codes taught women that their bodies were more dangerous than that of a man’s. In December of 1980 Mary M. Carroll brought the Carroll v. Talman Federal Savings & Loan Association to court to go fight sexist dress codes in places of work by claiming they were against Title VII (Disparate Dress Codes as Sex Discrimination in Violation of Title VII). Title VII was created in 1964 and protects equality by prohibiting employers to discriminate for any reasons: gender, age, race, religion, national origin, or sex (Disparate Dress Codes as Sex Discrimination in Violation of Title VII). The Chicago-Kent Law Review describes the case briefly: “…dress code requiring its female employees to wear a uniform… while only requiring male employees in the same job position to wear ‘appropriate business attire’” (Disparate Dress Codes as Sex Discrimination in Violation of Title VII). Dress codes in the 1980s seemed to be limited, so I was interested in hearing first-hand what they were …show more content…
A few did though, recounted their thoughts on them. Stephen Foster, who graduated Maumee Valley Country Day School in 1984, stated “dress codes were stricter when I was in highschool. Girls couldn’t have any cleavage showing ever and all the dress codes were more enforced than they are now,” he continued, “You couldn’t wear super tight jeans like now and you couldn’t wear tee-shirts with profanity, they even tried to get rid of all shirts with words but they couldn’t do that.” Douglas Smith, who graduated Southview High School in 1993, said “I didn’t really have a dress code that was enforced, but the girls did. Girls couldn’t wear short shorts or tight clothing really.” Both men remembered the dress codes imposed on females being more strict than those for males. This shows that through the 1980s and into the 90s a woman’s body was treated with more caution than a man’s. A few females that I talked to said they don’t remember ever feeling oppressed by their dress codes, but they also didn’t remember their dress codes very well,

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