Mark Twain Lies In Huckleberry Finn

Huckleberry Finn is a well renowned character that assesses situations and using lying where it is needed. Why do individuals lie to their authority? Is it to escape the consequences, or is it for someone else’s best? In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, the preeminent character, Huck Finn, answers yes to both sides of the latter question. Can they justify why they lie, or does it seem immoral to them? Once again, Huck can inquire that he can vouch for both. Are they skillful liars? Huck will brag to you that he is indeed. In Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Huck deals with deceit and truths in three ways in order to aid with his current situation in the book: Huck justifies why he lies in the instances he sees fit, he …show more content…
Throughout the story Huck lies many times, but his false-tellings contribute to an significant ideal for the most of the time. Huck displays this in the novel when he wants to save the captain in the boat wreck and also send the robbers to jail. To accomplish this task, it is necessary for him to find another boatman and say that his family is in the wreck. Upon hearing this the deckhand has to aid the poor lad. Huck is proud of himself, saying, “I was feeling ruther comfortable on accounts of taking all this trouble for that gang, for not many would a done it. I wished the widow knowed about it. I judged she would be proud of me for helping these rapscallions...” (Twain, pg. 70). Huck is showing here that in this case he is trying to please others with his lying. However, before he realizes this act could …show more content…
Huck expresses this view in an obvious fashion when he encounters the king and the duke. “It didn’t take me long to make up my mind that these liars warn’t no kings nor dukes, at all, but just low-down humbugs and frauds,” (Twain, pg. 115) Huck says. It is evident that Huck does not condone the behavior of the king and the duke since their motive is evil. Huck’s statement also shows the reader that he does not surmise that they are superior liars. An additional event in the story, the king and duke both exhibit their fraudulent actions when they trick a family in order to acquire money. For the second time, Huck dislikes their actions for the reason that their intentions are villainous. He is infuriated to the extent that he takes action into his own hands and tries to warn the family. Huck shows how he perceives certain lies negatively when he says, “All right, then, I’ll go to hell” (Twain, pg. 195). Huck acknowledges that lying is immoral, but he also states that he does not care. This statement is also a turning point for Huck in the plot. He begins to use his lying even more selectively after this point. In short, Huck disowns unnecessary lying either from himself or

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