Disgraced And A Raisin In The Sun Analysis

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The plays Disgraced and A Raisin in the Sun are about two men and their families going through a time of racial tension, the Younger Family, the family in A Raisin in the Sun, faces discrimination towards the African American community of the fifties while Amir, the protagonist in Disgraced, and his family face the prejudice against Muslims in the modern era. They face different type of hardships, but are more similar than they may appear. They both struggle with the concept of cultural identity and heritage. Though each of the plays demonstrates different ways their characters deal with heritage they deal with different aspects of dealing with it. Disgraced deals with a character who is ashamed of his heritage and identifies with the American …show more content…
In the beginning, she has long straight hair until Asagai is introduced and teases her about it. She cuts her hair and wears the dress dreaming of being an African queen. Beneatha has a fantastical idea of her heritage and dreams of a place she has never been to having no idea of what it is actually like. Asagai has given her dreams of Africa and she buys into his message against assimilation. She expresses her dreams of Nigeria when Asagai brings her a traditional Nigerian dress, “She picks up the Nigerian dress and holds it up to her in front of the mirror again… Then she starts to wriggle in front of the mirror as she thinks a Nigerian woman might.” (Hansberry 66). Beneatha has already begun to imagine what Nigeria is like even though she never been there, and her only experience with the people from there is one college student. She is more than ready to abandon her American Heritage and assimilate into Nigerian culture without any real idea of what it is like. Her views of her culture are the opposite of Amir’s. While Amir accepts the culture of the country he was born in and raised in, Beneatha holds contempt for American culture and revels in the culture of her …show more content…
She chooses to accept the heritage of her ancestors instead of the one she was born into. When Beneatha begins to sing to a Nigerian melody Ruth dismisses her as a child and when. The atmosphere becomes hostile and only is strengthened when Beneatha’s boyfriend George joins in. this is when Beneatha declares what an assimilationist is, “It means someone who is willing to give up his own culture and submerge himself completely in the dominant, and in this case, oppressive culture.” (Hansberry 81). Beneatha was born and raised in America s were her parents, and yet she feels as that the culture she and her parents have grown up in is not theirs. Her culture is the culture of her ancestors and she considers accepting her own culture as assimilation into another. She is swayed by emotion and words, and acts the young rebel. She is passionate about a place she has never been to and a culture she has never truly experienced. Unlike Amir she has accepted the rhetoric of people like Asagai, and firmly believes in it. It is that rhetoric which convinces her that it would better for her to leave her actual culture all together, and embrace

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