Disenfranchisement Of African Americans

1749 Words 7 Pages
Then to Now: Events and Developments Affecting African Americans
Gabrielle Jones
History 204
Professor Cora Dunaway
22 December 2014 Throughout history, African Americans have struggled for the privileges and rights that were bestowed upon Caucasian Americans to be upon their people as well. There have been many attempts and loopholes used to disenfranchise African Americans, attempting to keep them as close to slavery as possible. Since the Civil War, that gave African Americans the new title of ‘freedmen’ in which they were legally no longer slaves, many a things changed for them some in a good perspective and some in a bad one. Not to say there were not setbacks, but improvements were made to better the lives of African Americans.
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To keep them as close to slavery as possible, white Americans had to make them think that slavery is all they could know. After the Civil War, African Americans were allowed to learn but attaining that learning was a difficult process seeing how many African Americans dropped out of grade school, and secondary school was predominantly for white Americans. When the Tuskegee Institute was founded by Booker T. Washington, its initial purpose was for it to be an industrial vocational school. It was meant to teach African Americans how to find adequate work and to be prepared for it. Later, the curriculum for Tuskegee Institute changed to include academics while the public perspective of it was to focus on vocational advancements. According to Morowski, “Such coursework would not have been required to be proficient in trades or industry but would serve to provide an educated class of confident African Americans who could further future efforts for racial equality.” (2013, pg. 3) According to the quote, that is what transpired. African Americans, with the proper education to so, began using the education that they acquired at the institute to fight for justice and equality. Tuskegee Institute paved the way for African Americans to get an adequate education and fight for the rights that they were denied for long. (Morowski, …show more content…
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