Discuss The Impact Of The Migration On African American Migration

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After the migration of black Americans, which began after the First World War, many impacts were seen on the migrants themselves, the northern cities which they travelled too, as well as the southern cities they left. This essay will discuss these factors and show that the factors of the
Beginning with the effect seen on the north, as it had arguably the biggest impacts by the migration, we see a rapid increase in population in the northern states, cities such as New York grew in population from 91,709 to 327,706 n just twenty years. Factors like his, plus the closing of munition factories (they were no longer need as much as the war had ended), made it so there were fewer jobs available. The lack of jobs lead to mass unemployment (until the economic boom in the 1920s) and therefore resulting in low income and even homelessness for many Americans. Due to
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They were able to make the numbers up to make a difference. There were some cases where black citizens couldn’t come through with their political strategies as they were too spread across the city or state, e.g. New York. Those who did get political positions however were able to try and make black lives better within America. It is arguable to say that the migration was the first step to gaining equality.
Effects on black citizens were only seen in the north however. Southern black Americans, as well as the Deep South, suffered due to the migration. Since many of those who had migrated were former slaves (or descendants of slaves), there was a sudden lack of labour in the cotton plantations which spread through the Deep South. The plantations made much less profit and even in some cases had to shut down. Those who had remained were now the subject of even more racist discrimination as white southerners were angry about the loss of their

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