Discuss Inclusive Practice for Children with an Autistic Spectrum Disorder Within a Primary School Setting

3529 Words Feb 26th, 2013 15 Pages
BA Honours and Combined Honours in Education
And professional studies
Learners with Disabilities and Learning Difficulties
ED2234
Tutor: Frank J. Harrington
Discuss Inclusive Practice for Children with an Autistic Spectrum Disorder within a Primary School Setting

Mukaddes Cross
May 2012

Discuss Inclusive Practice for Children with an Autistic Spectrum Disorder within a Primary School Setting

According to The National Autistic Society (2011 and 2012), autism can be defined as a lifelong developmental disability which affects the way a person is able to interact with others around them and make sense of the world they live in. However, there are variations of Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and children who have ASD will be affected
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2005). Some studies which Bailey et al (1995) and Levy et al. (2002), refer to, assumes that there may be strong genetic links with regards to possible causes of ASD. On the contrary to Bailey and Levy et al., Yapko (2003) suggests that ASD could be the result of environmental factors such as some medication (antibiotics), reactions to infections or vaccinations. However, these claims are not concrete and are still being researched (Yapko, 2003). Moreover, it is clear that, there is a wide spectrum of ASD, with this came the need for wide spectrum of educational requirements that needs to be met. Therefore educational provision, including mainstream schools, special schools, specialist units attached to mainstream schools and residential provision are essential for the child’s well being and educational needs (NAS, 2012).

Historically children with ASDs were educated separately from their more able peers (Ferrall, 2010). Traditionally special education (SE) curriculum was put in place in order to enable children with disabilities and learning difficulties to adapt, and function accordingly within ‘normal’ society (Low Deiner, 2009). With the introduction of the Warnock Report in 1978, special education began to reform with the child’s education needs focussed on, rather than their disability (Wall, 2006). The report wanted to abolish the idea of handicap, as they began to recognise that labelling children negatively would be

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