Women In Police Force

Improved Essays
The sight of a female police officer may catch the average person off guard, but people should embrace the fact that our culture is ever-changing and women can participate in the same roles as men. Statistics show that about 15% of women make up state, municipal, and county police officers.These numbers can vary though depending on the area of different police agencies. Women account for roughly 20% of all officers in cities and counties, but overall in state police departments women only account for less than 6% of the police force. Women often times fear becoming a part of police departments or serving in law enforcement due to their size. Women need to realize size has nothing to do with the matter. Their creativity, bravery, and strength …show more content…
Sexuality is even becoming a hot button topic that is more open and tolerated. These statements are true, but they do not apply to every single situation in this world. They see that women will be a target and end up getting hurt or used in situations that go against them. Many people believe women are still inferior or submissive and do not have what it takes to protect and serve because they do not see women as fit to hold down an interrogation or even take down a fugitive who outweighs them. They claim to see men as stronger individuals and the only ones capable to handle situations. Women have been pushed down and made to feel as low individuals since the early 1900s in Law Enforcement. They were restricted to single handedly watching women prisoners and taking care of the children because they were seen as incapable to handle any other jobs. Not until the early 1960s were women able to work undercover and assist more in depth. They gave up their time and continued to give endless effort to help their communities and make a change, but still could not even graduate out of the Women’s Bureau or to become full time police officers due to their gender (“Women in Law Enforcement”). According to Jon Felperin, the Director of The Center For Law Enforcement Training, “In 2004, women accounted for only 12.7 percent of all sworn law enforcement positions in large agencies and the numbers are declining. The percentage of sworn female officers in smaller agencies are even lower (most agencies in the U.S. have fewer than ten sworn officers) in spite of women comprising at 46.5 percent of the entire labor force.” These women are fighting an uphill battle to protect themselves and those around them, but they are also facing a trying battle to be recognized for all they can give and

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