Discrimination In To Kill A Mockingbird By Harper Lee

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In Harper Lee’s novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, the author depicts the life of a young girl named Scout. Through the eyes of Scout the novel explores the many themes of discrimination. One form of discrimination was racism which was common in the heart of the south during the 1930s. Scout was raised when racism was acceptable and the social way of life, but she stood firm with her belief that there were only one type of folks, just folks, which meant that everyone should be treated equally and were the same. She witnessed segregation and had to learn the value that education had on her society, with education came respect. During the 1930s segregation dominated the way of the South. Many blacks got accused of committing horrible crimes, and were …show more content…
Boo Radley created so much fear in his town and was viewed as a freak and a beast. He was always blamed for all the dreadful conditions that transpired in his town. No one in town wanted anything to do with him because of his disability, until Scout and Jem find this to be untrue. He was rather a gentle and an innocent soul, who loved children, Jem and Scout especially. The last form of discrimination is against poor people like the Cunningham 's and even the Ewells who were viewed as less than human but more like dirty, wild animals and were not qualified to receive the town 's respect. In To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee reveals the many ways discriminated was used against the innocence in the small town of Maycomb, Alabama in the …show more content…
One character that was used was Boo Radley. Boo Radley was discriminated by his town because of his disability. Everyone had assumed that all the horrible things that had happened were his doings. Everyone, especially the children were fascinated the Radley 's place, because no one knows what goes on in there. Scout had described him as “Inside the house lived a malevolent phantom, people said he existed but Jem and I had never seen him” (Lee 8). Jem gave his description of Boo Radley to Dill that he was “ Six and a half feet tall, judging from his tracks; he dined on raw squirrels and any cats he could catch, that was why his hands were bloodstained” (Lee 13). “Boo Radley is a compelling enigma and source of adventure for the children, but he also represents Scouts most personal lesson in judging others” (Felty

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