Discrimination In The Progressive Era

Decent Essays
United States is considered to be a melting pot of many ethnicities. These ethnicities have helped United States grow, develop, and change by working together. From the late 1800s to the early 1900s, the Progressive Era, progression had become possible by looking past ethnic background and uniting the people as Americans to accomplish equality in rights, benefits, and work for all. However, it must be noted that these accomplishments of color America where not made by verbal dispute for equality but by working together and physically pushing through prejudice and racism till they reach their goal. “The wisest among my race understand that the agitation of questions of social equality is the extremist folly, and that progress in the enjoyment of all the privileges that will come to us must be the result of severe and constant struggle rather than of artificial forcing” ("Booker T. Washington Delivers the 1895 Atlanta Compromise Speech.").
During the early 1880, a labor force by the name of Knights of Labor stood at the
…show more content…
But with all these positive movements for color America during the Progressive Era, negative impacts also occurred. From the restriction of ones rights to the prejudice and unfair criminalization of others, ethnicities had to deal with massive oppression and numerous restrictions.
Through the process of ending election fraud the disenfranchisement of color America in the south became possible. Supported by many progressive white southern to force city government to be honest and efficient. “New literacy tests and residency and registration requirements, common in northern as well as southern states, limited the right to vote among the poor.” Being that almost all of color America was lower class, these electoral changes during the Progressive Era symbolized a considerable reversal of the idea that voting was a given right of American citizenship (Foner,

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Progressive Era Reformers

    • 1225 Words
    • 5 Pages

    The two groups acted as facilitators, raising awareness for the nation and forcing the government to take action. What reformers were unable to accomplish was picked up in later years and eventually developed into current conditions. Today America is commonly referred to as the “melting pot of the world”. The reason America can accommodate and attract so many diverse cultures is because it went through a vast amount of effective reform. The equality in the race, occupation, and opportunity all originated with muckrackers and reformers desire to bring about change in the…

    • 1225 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Voter-ID laws are resolutely interpreted as “racist,” and they have set the relationship between black voters and the Republican party back for at least a generation”(1). The progress made by black to achieve some rights are slowly being diminished as new laws are coming into play. These laws, like the voter ID, are deemed to affect the people in poor communities, many which are how to a great number of black Americans. Things to decrease the power of black have been ongoing since the presidency of Kennedy. In the case of Barack Obama presidential race, racial discrimination effected his campaign and the number of votes he received from the white population.…

    • 1434 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Black codes relate to the the theme Encounter. During this time blacks were dealing with a lot of problems because of the color of their skin. The whites tried to earn their control back over blacks after the civil war, creating chaos ("Black Codes" West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.). Black codes gave blacks very few rights, This shows how this is portraying the theme of encounter because blacks were encountering injustice and racism.…

    • 589 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The division between races was due to the political movements that were occurring at the time. The Jim Crow era was another key factor in this war since the laws prohibited interracial marriages, segregated schools and these laws involved lynching. However, this was brought some advantages to blacks, since it led to the nation 's first constitutional amendments to extended African Americans a full citizenship and equality before the law (Davis, Inhuman Bondage, 298). The civil war might have been brutal for many, both physically since it affected many individuals by the separation of race and economically since it affected many countries by taking their land away, however,…

    • 1882 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This led to several strikes and demonstrations by laborers. Also, black people and immigrants wanted racial equality. Slavery was over, but people were still not equal. White people remained privileged over all other races and progressives wanted this gone. They often used the constitution to fight for equality especially after former slaves had become citizens of America.…

    • 1261 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    They excused themselves simply because darker skin meant that that person was also inferior. Millions of minorities have suffered because of this. There were multiple laws that encouraged racism before and after the Civil War. These laws separated the whites and blacks and made it seem as if whites were higher in class than blacks. Bill Bigelow writes about this occurrence in “The Color Line”: “The social…

    • 1263 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    He states the general idea of equality and what it takes to break it, “Mankind being originally equals in the order of creation, the equality could only be destroyed by some subsequent circumstance; the distinctions of rich, and poor, may in a great measure be accounted for…” (Thomas Paine, Common Sense, p. 104). Paine is revealing a point, that colonial American government cannot coexist with the English government. Whereas America is striving for equal opportunities for all, England has a set system for the people in power passed through generations. Other political writers, such as Noah Webster say what he thinks makes America so different from England is that America is “Removed from the fears of a foreign invasion and conquest, they are not exposed to the convulsions that shake other governments; and the principles of freedom are so general and energetic, as to exclude the possibility of a change in our republican constitutions.” (Noah Webster, On Equality, p. 122). Webster is trying to say America is lucky because it is outside of the influence of most other countries.…

    • 795 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Lana Batarseh Professor Cerri History 320 10 March 2018 A People's History of Change The Progressive Movement, a movement for the people and by the people, was more important in comparison to the Populist movement, since it started the transformation of American history. The root of change originated in this productive era of reform for America's working middle class and the less fortunate. “Progressives could be found in all classes, regions, and races. “They shared a fundamental belief that America needed a new social consciousness to cope with the problems brought on by the enormous rush of economic and social change in the post–Civil War decades” (Faragher p. 457). The Populist Movement, also known as the People's Party, was motivated by good intentions, in which Americans sided with the right wing believed their country should represent their new reality after the 1896 election.…

    • 1024 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    “Slavery is such an atrocious debasement of human nature, that its very extirpation, if not performed with solicitous care, may sometimes open a source of serious evils (Franklin).” Franklin also believed that black people have the ability to learn the same as the whites and therefore they should have the opportunity for education. In Addition, both Jefferson and Franklin tried to get a constitutional support for the abolition, but they died with failure. At the time, it was hard to end slavery because it was such an economic basis, especially in the north. In most cultures, obtaining liberty requires sacrifices, hence the civil war in 1861-65 was inevitable. Black people were freed, but still inferior to some…

    • 912 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    He thought that America should be the land of opportunity for all people, provided they were willing to work. Sinclair's form of socialism dominated his writings as he attempted to provide a logical argument for what was, to him, a very personal and emotional issue. For Sinclair, the ideals of America stressed equality and brotherhood, but in all actuality, the rich did indeed get richer and the poor got poorer. No equality. No brotherhood.…

    • 1111 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays