Discrimination In The Great Gatsby

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Sharon Gless, a famous actress, once said, “Women and minorities have excelled beautifully in comedy, but very few women are the lead in a drama” (Gless). Indeed, before the Women Suffrage and Civil Rights Movement, women and minorities were often not respected and made fun of. Although many minorities were not respected and often viewed as subordinate, they were able to remain hopeful at American Dreams. For a long time, the American Dream was known as the “dream of a land in which life should be better and richer and fuller for everyone, with opportunity for each according to ability or achievement" (Adams, 214). And yet, women’s and minorities’ American dreams were often barricaded by racial stereotype most of the time. Due to segregation …show more content…
In the nineteen twenties, most Americans wanted to relax and enjoy life after experiencing the terribleness of war during the World War I, but many women and minorities were not able to due to discrimination against race and class status. However, some women attempted to climb up the status ladder by having an affair with wealthy people. Myrtle Wilson from F. Scott Fitzgerald 's The Great Gatsby is one of them. Although it is obvious to readers that Myrtle is unsatisfied because her husband, George Wilson, is poor, Myrtle claims that George tricked her to marry him because he “borrowed somebody’s best suit” to marry her without letting her know (Fitzgerald, 39). Hence, she dreamed for wealth, power, and social status. With his enormous amount of money and respectable reputation, Tom Buchanan seems to be the perfect target. In her secret apartment with Tom, …show more content…
Their approaches were very severe and probably the utmost. Emily Grierson from William Faulkner’s A Rose for Emily is one of them. Emily “[has] been a tradition, a duty, and a care; a sort of hereditary obligation upon the town” yet nobody knows nor cares about what Emily really wants (Faulkner, 716). Emily’s dream is to have the freedom to pick her mate herself, but her father, Mr. Grierson, has complete control of the family. Because Mr. Grierson prevented many of Emily’s suitors from marrying his daughter, the town people often imagined “Miss Emily as a slender figure in white in the background while her father a straddled silhouette in the foreground” to illustrate the absolute power her father has over Emily (Faulkner, 719). Under Mr. Grierson’s absolute ruling, Emily lived under immense amount of stress and pressure because she has to avoid any action that may harm her family’s reputation. Her distress is not relieved until Mr.Grierson’s death. But after being under absolute control for so long, Emily does not know how to make choices and express herself. She then realizes her need of her father and afraid that Homer Barron, her lover, will leave her like her father. Emily does not want to give up her American dream so she murdered Homer just so he will never leave her. Even when they died, their “body has apparently once lain in the attitude of an embrace, but now the

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