Compare And Contrast Notes Of A Native Son And Haygood's Showdown

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Dick Gregory once said, "This isn't a revolution of black against whites; this is a revolution of right against wrong. And right has never lost." He is explaining that whites and blacks are not at war with each other. Rather, it is about what is right and what is wrong. Moreover, he says that right has never lost, meaning right has more significance than wrong. When the country was plagued by racial tension and discrimination came into play, two important figures faced a tremendous amount of hardship. In the prologue to Showdown, Wil Haygood highlights the establishment of the National Association of the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). Thurgood Marshall who was one of the leading lawyers at that time became a symbol of black progress. …show more content…
The prologue to Showdown by Wil Haygood and the Notes of a Native Son by James Baldwin both illustrate that the injustice and unfair treatments African Americans underwent were a result of their limited rights in …show more content…
The harsh treatments that African Americans underwent, as described in both literatures, exhibits to readers the difficulties that segregation brought to people of color. Just because the Civil War was over and African Americans were said to be "free," this was not the happy ending that all African Americans had expected to be the outcome of such a gruesome war. The actual result was segregation and hatred rather than union and love. In the midst of all the unease, certain people like Baldwin and Marshall took a stance and fought for justice by either writing about their experiences or pushing forward a legal defense system. Baldwin wrote a book, highlighting all his rough and unpleasant experiences to teach others how doing wrong had hurt his family and how right will soon make things just again. On the other hand, Marshall took a political approach by fighting for desegregation in the courtroom and uniting different races so that they can live together peacefully. Through their writing, both Baldwin and Haygood depict how racial discrimination was a direct result of the limited rights of African Americans in society and how they took a stance for right over

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