Discrimination In Huck Finn

1157 Words 5 Pages
The U.S. is a lot different now than it was in the nineteenth century. Slavery has been abolished and racism is looked down upon. Kids are expected to branch off from the family, to get a different career and make a life for themselves and just about everyone gets an education. The author, Mark Twain conveys the message that the discrimination and treatment of people based on class and religion, race, and gender in society is unfair and needs to change through Huck’s behavior in the novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Huck is already pretty unconventional. His father is a drunk who went to prison, he lived by himself for most of his childhood, he found six thousand dollars in a cave that made him rich, which is always a rare experience, …show more content…
Huck came to live with Widow Douglas and Miss Watson. One way Miss Watson tries to civilize him is to introduce him to her religion. At dinner,” You couldn’t go right to eating you had to wait for the widow to tuck her head and grumble a little over the victuals” (Twain 4). She also read Huck stories from the bible and taught him about how to get to the good place and the bad place which Huck doesn’t understand and does not care about. When, “Miss Watson took me in the closet and prayed, but nothing come of it. She told me to pray every day, and whatever I asked for I would get it. I tried it once. Once I got a fish-line, but no hooks. It warn’t any good to me without hooks. I tried for hooks three or four times but I couldn’t make it work… I asked Miss Watson to try for me, she said I was fool”(Twain 14). When Miss Watson …show more content…
However, Huck regularly interacts with the slaves while living with Miss Watson and treats Jim as a friend and equal throughout the book. The first person Huck meets upon his escape is Jim. Jim tells Huck he ran away and Huck is disheartened at Jim’s actions at first, “’Huck.I—I run off…you said you wouldn’t tell’…’Well, I did. I said I wouldn’t, and I’ll stick to it…People would call me a low down Ablitionist and despise me for keeping mum…I ain’t going to tell and I ain’t agoing back there anyways.’” (Twain 51). Huck then listens to Jim’s explanation of why he ran away, “’Miss Watson pecks on me all the time, and treats me pretty rough, but she always said she wouldn’t sell me down to Orleans. I noticed there was a slave trader that visited there often that made me uneasy…I hear Miss Watson tell the Widow she was going to sell me down to Orleans, but she didn’t want to, but she’d get eight hundred dollars for me… the Widow tried to get her to reconsider…I snuck out and went down the hill and expected to steal a ship on the shore, but there were people there so I hid and when night came, I swam across the river.’”(Twain 51-52) “[Irony is] one specific element is crucial to understanding Twain’s contrast between the conventional hypocritical racism like Miss Watson and the independent thinking of Huck,

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