Discrimination During World War 2

Great Essays
World War II (WWII) was by no means completely burden-free for any ethnic group that had existed prior to the inception of the war. In the United States alone, groups such as the Jewish, African Americans, Women, Japanese, and Native Americans had all fought for their own domestically respective issues. With the start of the war came significant population deficits, blatant and unprecedented racism, and common economical upheavals. These issues reiterated the hard truth that no party was completely prepared for the largest human conflict of all time. However, there had been groups who had individually benefited as a result of the war post their heavy persecution. One can look at, for instance, the Jewish people following WWII. As a preface, …show more content…
These sorts of benefits were ornately visible in the communities of American ethnic groups throughout the course of WWII. It can not be stressed enough that a few of these ethnic groups were horribly persecuted against, but it is important to recognize positive resolutions as well. For which the United States is concerned, most ethnic groups experienced progressiveness even in the face of momentarily heightened discriminatory actions.

In history, African Americans have suffered extreme persecution. This type of racist discrimination was evidently obvious in the United States throughout WWII. African Americans were treated both unfairly and discriminatorily during the war, leading to escalation in racial domestic affairs such as the 1943 Detroit race riot. However, in terms of employment, African Americans improved and took advantage of the flux of available labor that came as a result of the war and overall received some benefits following the war’s conclusion. As the war progressed on, over 700,000 African Americans migrated North to take advantage of the large amount of defense jobs. Opportunities that were not readily available to African
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African-American soldiers had noted the irony and hypocrisy of fighting for freedom and democracy in Europe when they were unable to enjoy those freedoms themselves. The idea of “Should I Sacrifice to Live 'Half American?” became popular in America. Racial issues grew, eventually leading to a large -scale riot at the Belle Isle Park, Detroit 's main recreational area. News of the conflict spread quickly, leading to even more backlash and rioting. After four days federal troops had restored peace, but not after intense looting and murder. The impacts of the riot were huge, leaving seven hundred people injured, nine whites and five African Americans killed, and over two million dollars in property damage accumulated. Black morale was at a staggering low as a result of the heavy racial tension. A misconception even formed amongst African Americans that their lives would not change regardless of the victor of the war. One Cincinatti lady noted that, “It couldn 't be any worse for colored people. It may and it may not. It ain 't so good now." This sentiment led to the formation of the Double V campaign first conceptualized by James G. Thompson. It was written in the Pittsburgh Courier by Wilbert L. Holloway who encouraged his readers to “clip it out and place it in a conspicuous place… where all may see AND read!” Unsurprisingly, the message spread far

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