The Importance Of Aging In America

2044 Words 8 Pages
The most powerful country in the world is going through a revolution that it has never experienced before – the aging population of America. The aging process starts from birth and continues throughout the life cycle. In each growing stage there is a label attached – baby, toddler, teenager, young adult, middle-age, but the over 55 group has numerous labels – senior, senior citizen, older person, elderly, old codger, old bat, geezer, hag, and so forth. The last segment of our population is the group that society has a hard time dealing with. The thought of growing older and changing in appearance and physical abilities is less desirable than enjoying the beauty and ease of the young. Youth and beauty are prominent features that are idolized …show more content…
The media focuses on young beautiful people to promote merchandise, television shows, and movies. The advertisers who use older actors are gearing their products and services strictly to the older population. Rarely, do manufacturers use older people to model clothes, make-up, or jewelry. Viewing youthful people keeps away the thought of aging and the consequences that go with it. “Americans enjoy their individuality and feeling of control over what happens with our bodies. Aging and death are seen as out of our control and that produces feelings of fear and anxiety” (Nelson 39). Aging is often times viewed as an illness or disease that cannot be cured. Ironically, every human is designed to age and mature in the same progression. It would seem logical that people would embrace the later years and ensure that elders receive the respect and proper care that they deserve, since every human expects to go through this passage of …show more content…
Although it is against U.S. civil rights laws, employers knowingly or unknowingly establish discriminatory practices in hiring and terminating their staff. Nova Southeastern University researched discrimination amongst older workers who experienced discrimination and provided recommendations on how employers can prevent these practices from happening in their work place. They found that during interviews “unintentional ‘code words’ often are used during the interview process, such as ‘we’re looking for ‘go-getters’ and people who are ‘with-it,’ to describe desirable employees” (Cavico 3). These words are associated with younger workers, not people who are established. Not only do older workers have a tougher time getting hired, but they experience the higher risk of being first to be let go during layoffs. Because older employees have been on the job longer, receive a higher salary, and require more costly benefits, they are usually at the top of the list for

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