Discovery In The Kite Runner

1359 Words 6 Pages
The process of discovery enlightens and educates individuals with fresh, meaningful ideals about the physical and spiritual world, whilst also reshaping an individual’s perspectives of the world, themselves and others. Two texts which explore this dynamic of discovery is Simon Nasht’s documentary Frank Hurley: The Man Who Made History (2004) and Khaled Hosseini’s novel The Kite Runner (2003). Nasht’s documentary uses Frank Hurley’s expedition into the Antarctic as a vehicle to convey one’s pursuit for awe-inspiring discoveries of new and wondrous lands. Nasht also influences us in a positive light, as the unexpected meta-discovery of Hurley’s photographs elevates us to reassess their artistic and historical value. In a similar dynamic, Khaled …show more content…
Conversely, Hosseini’s novel demonstrates a reverse journey in which Amir returns to the Afghanistan of his childhood to save his nephew Sohrab. Even though both Amir and Hurley embark on journeys into unknown landscapes, the ramifications of discovery differ for individuals and their worlds. The shock and confrontation of the juxtaposing landscapes is immediately apparent. From his “two storey house in America” and his “books and novels”, Amir returns to a world where “the carcass of an old burned-out Soviet tank,” preface the poverty of “women in burqas” in “a string of mud houses”. The palpable experience immediately changes his sense of naivety, from the romantic, “Afghanistan would always be a part of him”, to the displacement metaphor that, “[he] was always a tourist here”. Likewise, a profound process of discovery and re-discovery is enabled through the motif of flying a Kite. The personification of the kites through “their paper-bird-flapping-its-wings sound” is key to expressing the ‘new world’ and the ‘open spaces’ that are catalysed by this symbolism, synonymous with leaving behind the familiar and entering profound new elevation, that of a free, “mind [that] drifted with the kites.” As such, much like Hurley’s activities and adventure in the Antarctic, Amir’s journey back to Afghanistan, and his …show more content…
Nasht encourages us to renew our perceptions on the artistic and historical world captured by Hurley’s photos. Hurley’s photographs capture timeless events through history which may otherwise be an insignificant “footnote in history”, allowing individuals to seek the artistic and historical value of the images. We are intrigued by Nasht’s inclusion of a low angle shot of the Endurance trapped in ice, accompanied by the enthusiastic tone of the narrator “The Endurance was domed…but it lives on in Hurley’s images”. We discover Hurley’s photos are themselves, singular moments of awe and wonder that captures the revelation of history. Nasht introduces a composite image of Hurley’s WW1 Image, highlighting the edited features, such as explosions and tanks on the foreground. The artificial sound of distant booms establishes that Hurley has reconstructed and enriched history by renewing our perspectives on the intense mood and emotions associated with war like never before. We desire to examine more of those concealed and “precious moments” through Hurley’s photographs due to the necessity of our human condition to explore and reassess the historical world. Nasht includes a full colour, low angle shot of Frank Hurley holding his camera, where Hurley says “the camera is just a mechanical apparatus, you are its intellect”. We discover that Hurley is not a legend – he is

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