The Pros And Cons Of A Private Education

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The American educational system presents a controversial discussion on effective curricula to ensure preparing students to remain predominant competitors in the reality of a global economy. However, civilians who persistently claim the eventual demise of academics due to the gradual progression towards standardization and privatization often deem it “obsolete and should be abolished” (Botsein). It is imperative though to consider the various aspects of a secondary institution that permit a student to mature as a responsible adult beyond the confinements of a classroom. Moreover, empirical research depicts the significant variance in national data due to students residing in impoverished communities. Hence, rather than abolishing the weakening …show more content…
However, rather than alter the reality of a weakened system, the author suggests the institution “is obsolete and should be abolished” (Botsein). Hence, as the essay provides a commentary on the broader societal implications that plague the established system, the argument emphasizes the necessity of exposing students to vocational skills to prepare them for the progressing modern culture. Further, in the early nineteenth century, the academic system was implemented by secondary schools to provide a broad liberal education to students despite economic uncertainty. In an essay discussing the disadvantages of a private education, author William Deresiewicz states, “As globalization sharpens economic insecurity, we are increasingly committing ourselves-as students, as parents, as a society-to a vast apparatus of educational advantage” (Deresiewicz). The author proceeds to suggest that rather than strive towards attaining an education from a private institution that “measures [intelligence] and academic achievement [as] measures of value in some moral or metaphysical sense,” students should seek a career; hence, as the nation rapidly progresses towards technological advances, the academics may be altered to provide students exposure to vocations beyond the …show more content…
It is imperative though to consider the limitations of claiming the demise of secondary academics due to inferior instruction as personal societal and economical circumstances interfere with a student’s ability to perform on standardized tests, as depicted through empirical research. As Leon Botsein implies, the superficial aspects of secondary education simply limit the cognitive development of an adolescent as the academic environment restricts communicative interactions and exposure to the responsibility of adulthood. Hence, perhaps the reform suggested by such politicians may be executed in a utopian society to efficiently alter the weakening educational system, however, in modern culture of globalization and privatization, elite institutions would simply worsen the condition. To surmise, despite the gradual demise of the American high school as an institution, government officials should rather seek effective reform to prepare students for vocational skills necessary for the responsibility of adulthood in a global economic

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