Advantages And Disadvantages Of Ableism

Decent Essays
Ableism can be defined by Campbell (2008) who argues ableism is connected with the production of ableness which refers to the perfect body by default (p.153). Campbell (2008) also argues that “the creation of a neologism that suggests a falling away from ableness that is disability (p.153). Ableism causes social marginalization and exclusion to those who do not conform to societies ablest norms (Dhamoon, 2009, p.113). The concept of ableism can be shown in the two readings the first one is “Regulating Difference: Accounts of Deaf and Transsexual Difference” from Identity/Difference Politics written by Rita Dhamoon. The second article is written by Judith Butler called “Doing Justice to Someone: Sex Reassignments and Allegories of Transsexuality. …show more content…
This case was given enormous attention because it challenged mainstream ideas of disability, but also around homosexual parenting. As Dhamoon (2009) argues deafness can be seen as a disability produced through the medical system or be seen as a cultural identity. Ken Connor, president of the US Family Research Council quotes “to intentionally give a child a disability, in additional to all the disadvantages that come as a result of being raised in a homosexual household, is incredibly selfish (Dhamoon, 2009, p.104). In most cases, disabilities will be looked at negatively rather than positively. It shows how society favours able bodies while, excluding those that fall into the disabled category. Even though many people do not see deafness as a disability. The second example is given of a male to female trans-sexual Kimberly Nixon who was denied the opportunity to volunteer at a feminist relief clinic (Dhamoon, 2009, p.114). Dominant thinking about sexuality in western culture was challenged because heteronormativity is viewed as normal and natural. As Dhamoon (2009) argues trans-sexuality is seen as deviant and abnormal because the person is not conforming to a true sex (p.107). Trans-sexuals fall into the disability notion because it is linked to an illness or gender disorder. This shows how trans-sexuals are …show more content…
A few months later was determined to be a girl, and then later in the teenage years decided to be a man (p.622). John/Joan went under Money and his teams control who believed they could reassign a new gender and live a normal life (Butler, 2001, p.623). It is important to understand how important ableism plays a role which often excludes members from society. To conform to the norm one must fit into the male female binary according to scientific models. “Medical practitioners often say to parents the child will not look normal if not operated on” (Butler, 2001, p.626). Science is used to create difference and discriminate others while reinforcing the norm. Science is also used to create cures for the people who step out of the norm which enables an ablest society. Ableism is intersected with gender within this reading to show that in order for gender to work the body must appear a certain way and that a body must feel a certain way (Butler, 2001, p.632). It shows how society favours able bodies and excludes and marginalizes those who fall out of the norm. Heteronormativity and ableism play a role in understanding who a person is, the way they behave and whether or not they fit into society’s norms. Gender is clearly part of an individual identity, but it is also used as a basis for differentiation. Meanings of difference are therefore socially constituted both by state and

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