Disability In Health Care

1085 Words 4 Pages
According to chapter 8, Healthcare, “the health care issue exploded in 1999 when the U.S. Supreme Court in the Olmstead, required states to offer services outside of a medical facility setting (Pg. 201).” Based on Disabled World, “about 1 – 5 people in America have a disability. Over a billion people, about 15% of the world’s population have some form of a disability”. I agree with the statistic, because more, and more people are finding themselves suffering with some form of health issues, from diabetes, to heart, kidney issues and cancer putting them in this category. In Olmstead, Elaine Wilson and Lois Curtis developed a disability, because they had a mental illness. The two women was given permission to be released from the …show more content…
Certified rate according the Illinois.gov website, certified staff’s is paid at a rate of 60% of the weighted average of that of a medical facility. The State of Illinois has statistical found out that it is less costly to assist those with a disability to stay in their home verse the effective cost of a medical facility. Therefore, in the article, Nursing Home, Assisted Living, or Independent, “the yearly cost for an assistant living care will cost the individual with a disability as estimated, $28, 800 to $66, 000 a year, compared to that of a nursing facility as estimate, $86,000 to $90, 000 (Kempston)”. These programs that states like Texas and Illinois, have implemented will save, the taxes payers and the individual an estimated total of $24, 000 to $58,000 per year based on the estimated cost. Below, I’ve added a simple chart that introduces to the reader a visual of the estimated …show more content…
Illinois and Texas as well other states have found it to be more beneficial to those who were either born with or due to some other issues that caused the disability to maintain a life that is filled with the uttermost normality. The chart above is just a small fraction of how nursing facility differ from assisted living programs. While working for DHS, I learned that programs like these help people with a disability live with pride, but they also allow the individual be cared for by a loved one, close friend, and hand-picked nursing staff. Chapter 8, in the Healthcare section, list many programs that assist people with a disability. TASH, estimates that 80% of Medicaid support institutional care facilities, and 20% of Medicaid is spent on community based programs and it has been proven to be less expensive for society (Pg.

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