Theories Of Feminism

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Growing up, gender was everything and it defined your life. For as long as I can remember, I wanted to be a boy. In my mind and in my sight they were superior, respected, and stronger. Looking back, I am not surprise. I grew up in a Patriarchal society where your voice cannot be heard. The motto “a lady should be seen, not heard.” It was not ladylike to speak loudly, to run, to shout, to play rough, and etc. When I heard the word feminism, I often thought of anger, pain, equality, women’s rights, notably the needs and wants of a woman. My definition of the word was most likely associated with my feelings towards being a woman. I wanted so badly to be a man. I avoided the conversation of one’s womanhood, I avoided anything related to feminism, …show more content…
To start with, women’s studies are the destabilization of modern theory. Is there a cause for women’s oppression? Can it be specified? The intention is to challenge, or reverse theory. To better understand, one must consider the differentiation of feminist theories. Feminism was divided into “liberal, socialist and radical varieties.”(Barrett & Phillips 3) Liberal feminists emphasized on prejudice, discrimination, irrationality, basically the stereotypical gender aspect of it. Women are different from men. Unlike the sexist prejudicial view, socialist feminists focused ideally on the idea of exploitation of women. In their perspective, the system actively benefited from women’s oppression. Finally, radical feminists emphasized that men got the better deal. Their perspectives are based on reproduction, eventually sexuality and ‘male violence.’ Similarly, socialists and radicals believe that the structure of oppression traces back deep into our past. Questionably, one must wonder which of them are fundamental. It varies based on perception. Despite different views, feminist unites together under the social cause as well as belief in rationality, progress both socially and politically, and the possibility of the bigger picture, social …show more content…
It demonstrates the role of race in class played in understanding women and gender as well as differentiating it. Feminism is also “social differences-in race, ethnicity, nationality, sexual identity, generation, class, physical ability- shape and are shaped by the politics of gender” (Hunter College 3). In this text, feminism has evolved into something bigger than white women wanting more in society. It is inclusive of every aspect of society- poor, gay, lesbians, immigrants, black, white, skinny, fat, old, children, strong, and weak. In a nut shell, women’s studies are the changes of men and women views in history. It is about the evolution of society through time to establish equality for all. It demonstrate that despite every groups agenda, they were able to come together to achieve a common goal. The integration of these various group were challenging, but the result was a catalyst in history that transformed society into our modern day. The fight is not 100 percent complete, but it is better, and there is progress. Feminism is all the issues of our

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