Differences Of The 20th Century Suffrage Movement

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The 19th century suffrage movement and the 20th century suffrage movement both had different ideas/ideals, arguments for suffrage, leaders, and tactics. The similarties and differences between these two centuries lead to the periods of the suffrage movement. Some of the most important leaders in the 19th century suffrage movement were Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Lucy Stone. In the 20th century suffrage movement, Alice Paul, and Carrie Chapman Catt were the leaders. As for the 19th and 20 century suffrage movement, both Anthony and Paul were focused on getting the vote through media, Catt and Stanton had their different tactics, and as for Stone, she was there with Anthony and Stanton along the ride. Anthony and Stanton …show more content…
Even though they were different centuries, they both knew the media could boost up for women getting the vote. Paul was a member of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) She used her productive media skills to get the attention of individuals who might or will be letting the women get the vote. Not only was Paul focused on the media by getting the vote, Paul was the organizer of the “National Woman 's Party (NWP) and the suffrage parade in front of the White House in 1913, had expressed her sympathy for black woman’s enfranchisement.” (Wheeler, 148) Not only was Paul focused on white women getting the vote, she was also focused on African American women getting the vote. Her loyalty to African American women could get the amendment through. After Paul was focused on getting white and African Americans the right to vote, she was a part of the British suffrage movement. Paul was focused on the federal amendment and publizating the national suffrage movement. “Paul introduced her famous plan of holding the party in power of being responsible for the failure to enfranchise women.” ( Wheeler, 278)
After also being arrested like Anthony, Paul fought and fought. She cared and respected women’s rights. You could say the Paul was more outspoken and radical in the way she approached people, such as the president, and others who didn’t support women’s suffrage. Even though Paul protested, and picketed, she never
…show more content…
They both had different tactics, which they both believed their views would get the women to vote. “Catt respected toughness and employed military language often enough that she had no business being too self-righteous in condemning the Woman’s Party. Moreover, all along she suspected that emotional appeals could at times be more effective than rational ones. (Wheeler, 311) Catt was determined to show her determination through her endless amount of work by pressuring the states, the president, and she also pushed the NAWSA’s main focus.Because Catt was living in the West, she knew one of her main tactics was to spread the importance of women’s suffrage. Catt was also very calm when approaching her tactics on why women should get the vote. She was against war, and violence. She believed that war and violence was not the answer on how women would get the vote. She was very strategic. She knew the ways women could get the vote, which also made her very logical. Catt would appeal to other quickly because she got the federal government involved. Her focus on the states definitely helped her prove her tactics. Since she got a lot of the states to support her, that meant the federal government would support her and her ideas as well, which, was a huge success. She carefully planned how she wanted to approach certain situations which led her for fighting for women’s suffrage so

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