Differences In Khaled Hosseini's The Kite Runner

1334 Words 6 Pages
It is human nature to make mistakes. Humans are changeable creatures who learn as they mature. It is rare for an individual to be born with all the knowledge he needs to coast through life without any bumps along the way. While often they may cause grief and regret, it is the mistakes humans make that teach them the lessons they need to become improved individuals. Mistakes cause people to look outside themselves and see the world around them more clearly. They assist in the strengthened sense of empathy and compassion for others. If an individual is unable to understand these lesson, they will live their lives in ignorance. In The Kite Runner, Khaled Hosseini develops the idea that redemption is required for an individual to heal from the …show more content…
When individuals are tormented by the guilt of betrayal, then they then must find an opportunity to redeem themselves to their loved ones, otherwise the rest of their life will be lead by immense regret. In the beginning of the novel, Amir is a privileged and somewhat selfish child who yearns for the affection and attention of his father. Amir appears polar opposite to Baba. While Baba is honourable, brawny and generous, Amir is weak willed, scrawny and selfish. Baba’s lack of affection towards his son, a result of his inability to understand Amir’s differences, leads Amir to believe that he is not loved. Therefore, Amir develops an inferiority complex. This is most clearly shown through his tormenting of his childhood friend, Hassan. Hassan displays qualities more similar to Baba’s; he is selfless and willing to take a stand against violence. This leads Amir to be jealous of Hassan,and he finds ways to make himself feel superior, like teasing Hassan about his illiteracy. Amir’s pursuit of Baba’s attention leads him to make the ultimate sacrifice; the love of a friend for the superficial …show more content…
He begins as a selfish, over privileged young boy whose priority is pining after the attention of his father. While he has a decent sense of right and wrong, as shown by his guilt for taking advantage of Hassan’s illiteracy to feel superior, he is motivated by selfish and childish desires, as well as a strong sense of self preservation. Living most of his life with the regret from his past, Amir is presented with a new circumstance to atone for his sins. After taking up this dangerous task, he truly becomes a changed individual. He transforms from a selfish child to a selfless adult who displays bravery rather than cowardice. Previously, Amir is too scared to stand up for what he believes is right because he does not want to get hurt, so he stands by and allows horrible situations to occur. The changed Amir directly faces his enemies and takes the risk of being killed for another person’s sake. He also finally stops allowing his past to torment him and works on doing good for other’s sake, specifically Sohrab’s. He has a deeper understanding of the world around him and strengthened morals. At the end of the novel, Amir begins to display many of the qualities his half brother possessed. Just like how Hassan loyally ran kites for Amir so that he can win Baba over, Amir now does it for Sohrab so that he may develop the will to live again. He even uses

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